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History 
of 

Wilmington Presbytery 

WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 
1868-1968 




Centennial Celebration 

NOVEMBER 21, 1968 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 
WILMINGTON, N. C. 




Wilmington Presbytery 



Centennial Celebration 

NOVEMBER 21, 1968 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 
WILMINGTON, N. C. 



Residence of Patrick Murphy, Esq., in which the Presbytery of Wilmington was 
organized on November 21, 1868. (The building, which stood at 8 North 
Fourth Street, has been torn down.) 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

Illustrations — 

Residence of Patrick Murphy 2 

Centennial Celebrants 4 

Rev. Robert Tate 7 

Rev. Colin Shaw 1 1 

Rev. Harold J. Dudley, D.D 26 

Wilmington Presbytery Map, 1868 28 

Agenda, Centennial Celebration 5 

Biography, Rev. Robert Tate 7 

Biography, Rev. Colin Shaw 11 

Address: "1968 In The Light of Yesterday and Tomorrow" 

—Dr. Ben L. Rose, D.D 15 

History, Wilmington Presbytery 27 

Introduction 29 

Footnotes 45 

Ministers Serving Wilmington Presbytery 1868-1968 53 

Moderators, Wilmington Presbytery 1868-1886 55 

Stated Clerks, Wilmington Presbytery 1868-1886 5 5 

Treasurers, Wilmington Presbytery 1868-1886 55 

Table I — Original Churches, Statistics 56 

Table II— Statistics 1872-1967 5 8 

Ruling Elders 1868-1884 59 



Wilmington Presbytery Centennial celebration in Wilmington, First Church, 
November 21, 1968. Left to right: Rev. Jerome C. Jones, Pastor, First Church; 
Leslie N. Boney, Jr., Elder, First Church, Moderator Presbytery; Rev. James B. 
Tubbs, Exec. Secy. Wilmington Presbytery, Retiring Moderator; Dr. Ben L. 
Rose, Prof. Homeletics, UTS, Richmond, Va. and speaker for inspirational address. 
Dr. Harold J. Dudley absent when photograph was taken, (See page 26.) 



4 



THE 23 8th STATED MEETING OF WILMINGTON PRESBYTERY 
First Presbyterian Church, Wilmington, N. C. 
NOVEMBER 21, 1968 

Centennial Celebration 1868-1968 

Organ Prelude 
9:30 a.m. Organization of Presbytery 

Roll Call, Quorum determined, constitution of Presbytery 
Election of Moderator-Nominee: Mr. Leslie N. Boney, Jr. 

(Wilmington First) 
Introduction of Visiting Ministers 

Report: Sub-Committee on Program (James B. Tubbs, Chmn.) 

Announcement and Welcome — Host Church 
Appointment of Standing Committees: 

a. Bills and Overtures — James B. Tubbs, Chmn. (2 others) 

b. Leaves of Absence — (3 persons) 

c. Resolutions and Thanks — (3 persons) 
Communications — Reading and referrals 
Commission Reports (admitted to Record) 

10:15 a.m. Organ Voluntary — Charles Woodward, Organist — Selected 
10:30 a.m. Special Order of the Day 

Inspirational Address — "1968 in the Light of Yesterday and 
Tomorrow" — Dr. Ben L. Rose 
Hymn and Prayer 
11:30 a.m. Historical Address — Dr. Harold J. Dudley 

Necessary Announcements 
12:15 p.m. Recess for Luncheon 
12:30 p.m. Luncheon 
1:30 p.m. Reconvene 

Retiring Moderator's Sermon — James B. Tubbs 
Sacrament of The Lord's Supper — The Session of Wilmington, First 
Church, assisting, conducted by Jerome C. Jones and Retiring 
Moderator 

2:15 p.m. Recognition of The Family of Colin Shaw, First Moderator 
Recognition of The Family of Robert Tate, Fioneer Minister 

2:30 p.m. — Nominating Committee Report and Election of Commissioners 
to 1969 General Assembly 
Report: Commission on Minister and His Work 
Report: Council 

Report: Presbytery Boundaries Study Committee 
Report: Christianity and Health Committee 
Unfinished Business 
Report, Standing Committees: 

1. Leaves of Absence 

2. Resolutions and Thanks 

3. Bills and Overtures 
New Business 

Reading and Adoption of Minutes 
Time and Place of Next Meeting: 

(Friday) January 31, 1969, White Plains, 9:00 a.m. -1:00 p.m. 
Adjournment with prayer 



5 



I 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2014 



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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH OF THE LIFE AND LABORS 
OF REV. ROBERT TATE 




REV. ROBERT TATE 



The two streams of Presbyterian, immigration — Philadelphia and Wil- 
mington — met in after years in the person of Rev. Robert Tate, Pioneer Pres- 
byterian Preacher for the Lower Cape Fear region! But we are getting ahead 
of our story. 

William N. Tate, immigrant, married Miss Mary Roan. He settled in the 
Hawfields, Alamance County, North Carolina To them were born eight sons 
and one daughter, Mary, who married Mr. Strayhorn, at Hillsboro. Three sons 
settled in North Carolina, Samuel at Mebaneville, one brother at Beatties Ford, 
and Robert, born May 3, 1774, who was affectionately called, "Father Tate," 
by the Presbyterians of the Lower Cape Fear region. 

Robert Tate, son of William N. Tate and Mary Roan Tate, was educated at 
Dr. Caldwell's famous classical school — Old Caldwell Institute. Dr. Caldwell 
educated lawyers, statesmen and clergymen. Five of his pupils became governors 
of states, a number rose to the bench, many were physicians, and fifty became 
preachers. The older generation of ministers said their fathers told them that 
Mrs. Caldwell made the preachers. She, by her motherly spirit won the hearts 
of the students, and by her piety and zeal for the Kingdom of Christ encouraged 
the fifty students, who became Pioneers for Christ, to dedicate their lives to the 
service of the Great Teacher. Therefore Eastern North Carolina is indebted to 
Mrs. Caldwell for her beloved minister. Father Tate! 

When about the age of 21 years, Robert Tate was licensed by the Orange 
Presbytery to preach the Gospel, at the Flawfields church April, 1796. No field 
was assigned to him, and he was left to make his own selection. 

An incident mentioned by himself in a brief memoir published some years 
ago directed his attention to Onslow county. A young friend who was associated 



7 



with him in Dr. Caldwell's school invited him to visit his father's residence in 
Onslow county with a view of preaching the Gospel in that then destitute 
section, where but few Christians of any name were to be found, and a Presby- 
terian was unknown. Imbued with the true missionary spirit, the young licen- 
tiate mounted his horse with saddle-bags packed with a change of suits, with the 
Bible and hymn book, and set out on his lonely and then somewhat dangerous 
journey. We can hardly in these days of improvements, when by rail and other- 
wise the country can be traveled with ease and comfort, sympathize with a 
stranger who, equipped as above, left for the first time the parental roof. 

The pleasant associations of home, where Gospel privileges and Christian 
institutions shed their hallowed influences around, given up to encounter the 
wilderness, the swamps and bays, where the deadly malaria prevailed, and the 
curtains of death hung in graceful festoons from every branching tree. 

So, an "up-country man," whose imagination has been plentifully fed by 
tales of horror and "chimera dire" of the low country, it was no small under- 
taking in the year 1796 for a young man of Father Tate's age and raising to 
encounter the difficulties of the way, to say nothing of his receptions by the 
rude people of a minister of the Gospel, and that, too, Presbyterian, a name 
almost unknown in this section of the country at that time. 

The nearest and only organized churches then in existence in this section 
of the country were: the Grove church, near Kenansville, and Black River Chapel, 
in New Hanover County, the latter of which was organized before the Revolu- 
tionary War, and was served successively by Messrs. Bingham, Tate, etc. 

After laboring diligently and faithfully in his chosen field for almost 3 years, 
he was ordained by the Presbytery of Orange at Rockfish in 1799; and a church 
was duly organized at that place in the fall of the same year, to which Father 
Tate ministered many years, showing the good seed broadcast and watering the 
same with many tears. 

The work of the Lord found access in the hearts of many in this and ad- 
joining section, and, as the fruits of Father Tate's labors, churches were estab- 
Kshed at Hopewell and Keith, and since then as off-shoots. Mount Williams, 
Pike and Mount Zion churches. 

Father Tate labored many years at Black River Chapel, Brown Marsh and 
other localities, where the standard of Presbyterianism was unfurled, and Gospel 
institutions were sustained and perpetuated by his instrumentaHty. 

This venerable servant for many years bore the burden and heat of th^; con- 
test for Christ, in His cause, in the region of country designated above almost 
alone, and his worthy name and fair reputation have been properly appreciated 
by the people to whom he ministered for so many years by embalming his name 
in almost every family in the section of the country. 

The name of Robert Tate, outside of the family connections, will not die 
out with this generation. 

Father Tate was married twice, first to Miss Margaret Bloodworth, of New 
Hanover, and second to Elizabeth Hunter, of Duplin County. He had issue 
from both, and they were the heirs and inheritors of an honorable name and 
many Christian virtues. 

Much could be said in the way of Commendation of his virtues as a man, 
as a Christian and as a minister of the Gospel, whose good offices to number, 
kindly acts and generous forbearance to all persons, relatives, friends and serv- 
ants, gained for him a reputation and endeared him to all who enjoyed his 
hospitality and fell under his Christian example. 

Much, very much more, might be said, and truthfully said, of this venerable 
father in the way of praise, but we are only giving a sketch of his life, and we 



8 



must study brevity. A few words as to character as a preacher will close this 
account. His education for that day and time was the usual required by the 
Book — that he improved and cultivated his mind may be inferred, as he taught 
school as time and opportunity offered him suitable facilities. He seemed, how- 
ever, never to have aspired to a high grade of scholarship, nor to have felt its 
necessity from his surroundings. 

That he approved and encouraged in others what seemed a defect in himself 
admits of no doubt, as he gave his own sons a liberal education at our State Uni- 
versity. His library was never extensive, but what books he consulted were 
thoroughly mastered. The Bible, that Book of Books, was his treasury of know- 
ledge. Thence he drew not only his inspiration, but his knowledge. Possessing 
a most retentive memory, he stored his mind with a vast amount of textual 
furniture, with which his sermons abounded. He was a practical, rather than 
a doctrinal, expositor. Not that he was deficient in any of the great and funda- 
mental doctrines of the church, for he sometimes indulged in polemical re- 
encounters, when his opponents were made sensible of his accumulated store of 
knowledge, and the sharpness and keenness of his theological blade. Doctrines 
were not his forte, nor to his taste. His habits of life, his secular calling, that 
of a farmer (this came as believed a necessity of the times), and daily associa- 
tions bent his mind to practical things. Hence his pulpit performances partook 
more of the narrative than expository style, in which large portions of the 
Scripture history and biography were incorporated in his discourses. This 
method of preaching prevailed in his day, and was the acknowledged pattern set 
by the Saviour and his immediate followers — so he thought and acted. We are 
not called upon to criticize, but to narrate; hence our picture. 

Father Tate's example and influence in the churches is a legitimate topic for 
reflection. That his example was salutary, need not be questioned; that his 
influence was extensive and enduring, the churches that were organized by his 
agency abundantly testify. Thus his name has become a household word, asso- 
ciated as it is with all that is lovely and of good report. Though being dead, he 
liveth in the memory of God's people as the indulgent parent, the generous 
friend, the wise counsellor, the humble disciple, and the successful minister of 
Christ. His death occurred in 1866 at the residence of his son, Thomas Tate, 
Rocky Point, New Hanover County, N. C, aged 92 years. 

By REV. COLIN SHAW 



9 



THE REV. COLIN SHAW, PREACHER AND PATRIOT 



"'"5= 




REV. COLIN SHAW 



During the last half of the 19th century, the Rev. Colin Shaw functioned 
as an institution in the Cape Fear and Black River sections as a minister, mis- 
sionary and Southern Patriot. There was hardly a Presbyterian family between 
Fayetteville and Wilmington who had not at least one member baptized, mar- 
ried or buried by this venerable clergyman. 

The Rev. Colin Shaw was born in Fayetteville, N. C, on August 16, 1812, 
and was the son of John Shaw and Frances Faison Shaw. His maternal grand- 
father, Henry Faison, was one of the pioneer settlers of Duplin. John and 
Frances Shaw had three other children: Ann, Elias Faison, and Henry Faison. 
John Shaw was the son of Colin Shaw who migrated in 1747, from the Isle of 
Jura in Scotland, to Cumberland County, N. C. John Shaw had one brother 
Elijah Shaw. The Rev. Colin Shaw's brother, Elias Faison Shaw was a practicing 
physician, near Turkey, N. C, and married his cousin Arabelle Faison. He was 
a lieutenant-colonel in the Confederate Army. 

Colin Shaw was reared on a farm between Cross Creek and the Cape Fear 
River. In 1825, his family moved to a farm on Hood's Swamp, in Sampson 
County, where his mother, Frances Shaw, later died. The father migrated to 
Georgia, and the oldest sons, Colin and Henry moved to Fayetteville. Henry 
later died while employed as a clerk by a merchant, Hugh McLaurin, in Fayette- 
ville, N. C. Colin was employed for three years in the post office under the 
postmaster, John McRae. 

Colin Shaw had probably attended some of the local schools earlier, but he 
began his Hterary course at the age of 21 at Donaldson Academy, which was 
operated at that time by Dr. Simeon Colton. He later entered the University 
of Norh Carolina, at Chapel Hill, where he graduated in 183 8. One of his 
classmates and friends was the Hon. George Davis, of Wilmington, who was 



11 



later to become Attorney-General of the Confederate States. In 183 8-39, he 
attended the Union Theological Seminary in Virginia, and in 1840, he attended 
Columbia Theological Seminary. In 1841, he returned to the University of 
N. C. and received his master of Arts degree. 

In 1841, Colin Shaw was licensed to preach by the Fayctteville Presbytery 
at South River Chapel near Garland, N. C. In the fall of the same year, he was 
ordained at the historic Black River Chapel, near Ivanhoe, in Sampson County, 
and the committee appointed to conduct the services was made up of the 
following: the Rev. Robert Tate, the Rev. William Brobston, the Rev. Archibald 
Baker, and the Rev. James Kerr. 

In 1842, the Rev. Colin Shaw was married to Phoebe Bannerman, the daugh- 
ter of George Bannerman, of Kerr, in Sampson Co. The Bannermans (actually 
McGregor) were also sturdy old Scottish settlers, who settled on South River 
and became plantation people. The Shaws built a home in the Lake Creek Section 
of Bladen County, where they were known far and wide for their hospitahty 
and were always surrounded by people who had a talent for excellent conversa- 
tion. Mr. Shaw served as pastor of Black River Chapel and South River Chapel 
for many years. He possessed a very fine library (many books are preserved 
by descendants) and was considered the most widely-read minister in the N. C. 
Synod. He was also a fox and deer hunter and an ardent fisherman. 

The Rev. and Mrs. Colin Shaw had the following children: Washington 
Irving, Frances, Mary (Molly), Phoebie (died young), Heman (died young), 
Neil Graham, Henry Elias, William and Leslie. 

At the beginning of the War between the States, the Rev. Colin Shaw re- 
signed his pastorate and joined the Confederate Army as a Chaplain of the 
18th N. C. Regiment. He was later made Chaplain of the 60th N. C. Regiment 
and saw duty during the heroic defense of Charleston, S. C. Early in 1865, 
Chaplain Shaw came home and organized a company of "guerillas" to defend 
his home community against the wholesale vandalism and robbers of Sherman's 
Army. He was then called Captain Shaw, and his first group was composed 
of the following: Robert Cook, Irving Shaw, Edward K. Anders, Robert H. 
Holiday, Van B. Sutton, and the old Mexican War Veteran, Robert K. Melvin. 
Fort Fisher had fallen and General A. H. Terry with ten thousand men was 
enroute from Wilmington to Goldsboro. Captain Shaw and his men had a 
skirmish with Terry's guards at Duplin Crossroads (now Wallace). 

On the second Sunday in March 1865, the first squad (foragers) of Sher- 
man's "bummers" came to the Shaw plantation and carried away all the provi- 
sions, the mules, the family carriage, besides ransacking the house. The silver 
and jewelry was saved because it had already been buried. They raided other 
plantations in the Black River community and flagrantly insulted the good 
Confederate families. The next morning Captain Shaw's company met the 
Yankee "bummers" at the home of Milton Newton, attacked them, wounded 
one and put the others to flight besides re-capturing several mules and horses 
which belonged to the neighborhood people. Captain Shaw now mounted his 
company. At that time, Sherman's cavalry under General Hugh J. Kilpatrick 
was encamped at Lisburn's Bridge, near Ingold, N. C. Captain Shaw encoun- 
tered a squad of Kilpatrick's scouts, armed with repeating rifles. He charged 
them put them to flight and captured one. The next day General Kilpatrick 
sent a hundred armed men to the Shaw house. They found Mrs. Shaw, her small 
children and the servants alone. They gave them two minutes to get out of the 
house before they applied the torch. While the house was burning. Captain 
Shaw's daughter Mary (Molly) rushed to the piano in the parlor and played the 
Southern anthem, "Dixie." Before the roof fell in, she had to be rescued through 



12 



the window. A few days later, Captain Shaw joined Wheeler's Cavalry, which 
brought some little relief to the state of anarchy which resulted from the Yankee 
invasion. About this time, Captain Shaw received the news of the death of his 
brother, Lt. Col. Elias Faison Shaw, at the Battle of Chamberlain Run, on March 
3 1, 1865. 

After the war, the Rev. Colin Shaw and his family returned to their planta- 
tion and lived in an outbuilding until a dwelling could be built. Most of the 
servants remained faithful during the war and during the dark years of Recon- 
struction. During the ensuing years, Mr. Shaw served as pastor of Black River, 
South River, Keith, Mt. Williams, Pike, Hopewell, Warsaw, Rockfish, Oak 
Plain, and other churches. While serving as Moderator of the Wilmington Pres- 
bytery, he became an intimate friend of Dr. Joseph R. Wilson, the father of 
President Woodrow Wilson, who at that time was pastor of the Wilmington 
Presbyterian Church. 

The Rev. Colin Shaw was a dedicated Christian pastor and missionary, and 
he never flinched from duty. He considered himself as an ambassador of Christ 
and he was ever a faithful preacher of righteousness, and morals. He cheerfully 
accepted the pastorate of churches who could pay almost no salary and traveled 
great distances to conduct protracted meetings. Even in his old age, he always 
attended the meeting of the Presbytery and served at one time as moderator of 
the Synod of N. C. He was considered an authority on Presbyterian Theology 
and discipline. He was appointed by the Synod to preside at the organization 
of the Wilmington Presbytery at the home of Patrick Murphy in Wilmington 
on November 21, 1868. 

Late in life, the Shaws moved to Magnolia and much later they went to 
live with their children. The Rev. Colin Shaw died at the house of his son, 
Leslie Shaw, on July 8, 1905, at the age of 92. He was buried in the Bannerman 
Family Graveyard, near Kerr, N. C. And thus ended the mortal life of this 
great prince of the church and Southern patriot. 

By CLAUDE HUNTER MOORE 
(From THE PRESBYTERIAN NEWS— August, 1966) 



13 



An address to the Presbytery of Wilmington on the occasion of its 
Cent en nial a n ni versa ry. 



1968 IN THE LIGHT OF YESTERDAY AND TOMORROW^ 

By BEN L. ROSE 

An anniversary affords us an opportunity to pause in the midst of the years 
and take stock of ourselves. It gives us the occasion to step back for a moment 
and observe where we stand in history, where we have been, and where we are 
going. 

I want us this morning, therefore, first of all to take a fresh look at the past. 
Then we shall attempt to get a glimpse of the future, in order that we may 
finally see 1968 in the light of yesterday and tomorrow. 

1. We look first to the past. 

It is the part of wisdom frequently to review the records of former days, 
for only a fool ignores his history. The man who is not acquainted with the 
story of his people, his nation, his church — that man has pauperized himself and 
made his soul the poorer. He cannot share the glory, the heroism, the exhilarat- 
ing events of the people from which he sprang. The man who ignores history 
narrows his emotions to the little day in which he Hves. But more than that, the 
man who does not know history is destined to repeat its mistakes. And he has 
surrendered the comfort and strength which a knowledge of history can bring. 

Nevertheless, as one reviews the past he does well to remember that there 
are grave dangers involved in such a study. Centennial celebrations may lead 
us to place an inordinate emphasis upon the past, to glory overmuch in the 
works of our fathers, and to shirk the duties and problems that are our own. We 
may substitute appreciation of the deeds of yesterday for dedication to the 
tasks of today. 

On such an occasion as this we need also to guard against the danger of 
whitewashing the past. In celebrating our history we may falsify it, rewrite into 
something that it never was. 

The Russians we are told have done this. They claim to have invented the 
airplane, the cotton gin, the submarine, and a host of other things which a truer 
history attributes to inventors of other nations. 

But the Russians are not the only people who do this. Sometimes we have 
done it to the history of the South. In defending our heritage we have acted 
a3 if no slaves were mistreated here, and no Negroes ever lynched. Or, if we 
acknowledge such atrocities, we minimized them and pictured them as less 
grievous than they really were. 

We do not honor our forebears when we act as though they never did any- 
thing wrong, as though their motives were always pure and their judgments 
never in error. Nor do we revere our heritage when we pretend that certain 
misdeeds never occurred or try to paint tragic events prettier than they really 
were. The true story of the white man's treatment of the American Indian is 
filled with double-dealing and treachery. Nor is the record of our ecclesiastical 
forebears without its seamy side. Our ancestors were not perfect. They had 
their prejudices and their blindnesses, and we do not honor them when we make 
them to appear as sinless saints and paragons of piety. 

Those persons who whitewash the past usually refuse to accept the verdicts 
of history. So they live in a dream world, glorifying a time that never was. 
The man who falsifies history is usually separated from reality. And by this 



15 



separation he is rendered incapable of changing for better the world in which 
he lives. The man who rewrites past history to his own choosing is destined in 
his day to write no history worth the reading. 

There is another peril in reviewing our history. This danger is that we will 
be ashamed of our heritage, that we will make fun of or ridicule our forefathers. 
Some people seem to enjoy downgrading the personalities and achievements of 
yesterday. They glorify the present, as though our little day contained all wis- 
dom and virtue. They whitewash, not the past, but the present. Such persons 
impute no evil to the rioters and looters in the recent outbreaks in Washington 
and Detroit. But they look with condemnation, or at least with a sort of pat- 
ronizing air, upon bygone days, and often act as if to be old fashioned were an 
unforgivable sin. There are some who expect me to apologize for my grand- 
father's efforts as a Confederate soldier to defend what he conceived to be his 
rights. 

But the man who is ashamed of his history is unworthy of it. Anyone who 
ridicules his forefathers will be, and deserves to be, ridiculed by his own sons. 
Condemnation of past generations is cheap arrogance and unbecoming of one 
who is grateful for the heritage he has received. Certainly our forebears made 
mistakes. But so have we. Let us, therefore, deal as sympathetically with our 
ancestors as we hope our descendants will deal with us. 

So let us look at the past, neither glorying in it overmuch, nor ridiculing, 
nor whitewashing it. But let us read it and accept it for what it is: the record 
of the people and the events who made ns who and what we are. 

Our course, we cannot review today our entire history. So, since we are 
celebrating our Centennial, let us focus on the situation 100 years ago. What 
was happening in 1868? 

To put it mildly, 1868 was a trouble time. We sometimes act as if the Church 
and the country and the world never experienced any turmoil or crises before. 
It is quite comforting, therefore, to discover that things 100 years ago were 
not too different from what they are right now. Indeed, some of the similarities 
are startling. 

In November 1868 a bickering, divided Democratic Party had just lost an 
election. A lame-duck President, another Mr. Johnson, was in the White House. 
That Mr. Johnson's popularity was so low in the spring of 1868 that impeach- 
ment proceedings were brought against him. When Andrew Johnson stepped 
from the office of President in March 1869, one historian says: 

'Tew men that have occupied so high a station have ever been so un- 
reasonably slandered and vilified as Andrew Johnson. His own unfor- 
tunate, irritating manners and methods will account for a good deal of 
the misunderstanding of his character, but the violence of the times was 
the occasion of a great deal more of it." (Redpath's History of U. S., 
Vol. XI, p. 5416.) 

The times jvcre violent. The Civil War was only three years behind and 
war is always a brutalizing thing. The Reconstruction Era in the South was 
at its height. The whites were bitter, and the blacks were disappointed, and 
both races were frustrated. There was crime in the streets! There were riots in 
the cities! The social and political fabric of the country was being ripped to 
shreds. 

If you think there is political turmoil in Washington today, read the his- 
tory of 1868 and take heart. The ship of state, without a strong hand at the 
helm, seems headed for the rocks. There was a running feud between the Presi- 
dent and his Secretary of War, Edwin M. Stanton. Both parties were split down 



16 



the middle on both domestic and foreign pohcy, and their statesmen were bick- 
ering Hke children. 

There were outbreaks of violence in many cities of the South. A riot started 
in Mobile because of alleged police brutality. There was another riot in New 
Orleans, and another in Camilla, Georgia, all of which resulted in the loss of 
lives and property. 

In the North Carolina Presbyterian, a weekly church paper published in 
Fayetteville, under the date of June 2 5, 1868, there appears a report of a riot 
in Wilmington. On the previous Saturday night a Negro had stolen a pair of 
shoes from a store on Market Street. The thief was captured by two citizens 
and turned over to the police. A crowd of Negroes gathered and began to as- 
sault the policemen with bricks and stones. The policemen, five in number, were 
all injured, one of them seriously. A riot followed during which much property 
was destroyed, and peace was not restored until the soldiers, who were sum- 
moned by the Mayor, arrived. 

Under the date of February 12, 1868, this article appeared in the Wilmington 
Journal: 

"Near Lumberton a few days ago . . . Mr. Durham Lewis was riding 
into town. He was stopped by two men with doublebarrel guns, pull- 
ed from his horse and robbed of all his money . . . About the same time, 
the house of Mr. John Smith, 3 miles from town, was entered in the 
day time. Mr. Smith and his family were driven out and the house ran- 
sacked. A few nights ago Mr. John McNair's house was entered and 
robbed. Several stores have been entered in this place and robbed." 
Then the reporter editorialized: 

"Robbery seems to be the order of the day in this country and there is no 
telling where it will end." 
Another note in the same paper reads: 

"In the local jail are now six freed men who have confessed to some re- 
cent robberies. All six belong to 'The Loyal League'." 
The Loyal League seems to have been quite like the present Black Panther or- 
ganization. 

The editor of the North Carolina Presbyterian expressed the opinion that 
''The whole fabric of constitutional liberty is tottering upon its base." And 
another writer in the same issue opined, "The federal constitution is dead. No 
one pays any attention to it anymore. It has ceased to be a vital power in the 
land." 

In 1868 there was colossal disdain for the federal government all over the 
country, but especially in the South. Today we are troubled by persons like 
hippies and draft-card burners who hold in contempt our government and its 
laws. We are angered by those who insult our flag and scorn our nation. But 
we do well to remember that our grandfathers in the South in 1868 harbored 
much the same contempt and gave voice to many of the same feelings. A popu- 
lar song in the state in 1868 went like this: 

O I'm a good ol' rebel. 

That's just what I am; 
For this fair land o' freedom 

I do not care a damn. 
I'm glad I fought against it, 

I only wish we'd won. 
And I don't want no pardon 

For nothing what I've done. 



17 



I hates the Constitution, 

This great RepubHc too. 
1 hates the Freedmans' Bureau 

In uniforms of blue. 
I hates the nasty eagle 

With all his brag and fuss; 
But the lying, thieving Yankees, 

I hates them wuss and wuss. 

I hates the Yankee nation 

And everything they do. 
I hates the Declaration 

Of Independence too. 
I hates the glorious union, 

'Tis drippin' with our blood; 
And I hates their striped banner, 

I fought it all I could. 

I do not mean to equate our Confederate grandfathers with hippies and 
draft-card burners. Although a picture of my grandfather, taken when he 
served as a Lieutenant in the defense of Fort Fisher, shows him to have had long 
hair and a black beard. 

But I do mean to remind us that such sentiments as are expressed by modern 
bearded rebels are not new in our land; that this country of ours has received 
before the slings and scorns of her citizens, has received them to an even greater 
extent than she receives them today, and still, as a nation, she did not disin- 
tegrate. 

Now, such knowledge does not move us to justify those who burn the 
stars and stripes today. But it does allow us to view their defiant acts with less 
alarm and to sit more loosely to their scornful railings. 

Thus a knowledge of past history is a comforting thing, for we see that the 
situation in which we find ourselves in the country is no worse than, if as bad 
as, it was 100 years ago. 

And what is true of our country is also true of our church. We are prone 
to view through rosy glasses the early days of the Presbyterian Church U. S. 
There were giants in the land in those days, great churchmen who led our 
people in the ways of true piety and faith. There were men like Robert Lewis 
Dabney and Benjamin M. Palmer, Moses D. Hoge and Joseph R. Wilson. So 
we tend to think that all was well in Zion then. But from the peace and purity 
of the Church in those pristine days, the story has been one of steady deteriora- 
tion, until we come to the present deplorable state of the Church. 

But an honest examination of the record relieves us of this false impres- 
sion. Our church 100 years ago was quite similar to what it is today. There 
were differences, which we shall see, but some of the similarities are almost 
humorous. 

The editor of the North Carolina Presbyterian wrote in March, 1868: 

"A general spiritual dearth seems to exist throughout the bounds of 
our Synod. No knowledge of an awakening reaches us from any quar- 
ter . . . Apathy, if not indifference, on subjects that relate to eternal 
interests pervade all classes and conditions of our people." 



18 



In May, 1868, the General Assembly met in the Franklin Street Church in 
Baltimore. A report on the state of religion within the bounds of our church 
contains this central paragraph: 

"In some portions of our territory, intemperance and profaneness have 
recently prevailed to an alarming extent. The complaint reaches us 
from many quarters that worldliness and indifference to spiritual things 
prevail amongst professing Christians . . ." 

That Assembly followed much the same tedious routine as Assemblies today 
do: hearing from fraternal delegates, listening to reports from numerous com- 
mittees, appointing more committees, deploring the lack of money for the sup- 
port of its work, and debating what they called the Freedman Question, which 
we would call the Race Question. 

An excerpt from a committee report read: 

"Many churches, engrossed by their own local affairs, show little in- 
terest and bear scarcely any part of the general enterprise of the Church." 

The Assembly's committee on Systematic Benevolences reported that a large 
number of churches gave nothing at all to any of the benevolent causes of the 
Assembly. It opined that the people had been inadequately instructed in Stew- 
ardship. 

A writer in the Southern Presbyterian Review in January 1868 expressed 
the opinion that "the great danger of our church today is Congregationalism." 

The Synod of North Carolina was having trouble with churches not giving 
to benevolent causes and appointed a committee to inquire into the matter. 
Union Theological Seminary in Virginia was planning to enlarge its library and 
repair its facilities, and this called for money from the Synod. 

In 1868 our church, along with other denominations, was suffering from 
a lack of ministers and a deficiency of candidates. The editor of the North 
Carolina Presbyterian expressed the opinion that: 

"The great reason for the lack of ministers today is to be found in the 
fact that, as a profession, ministers are more poorly paid for their serv- 
ices than any other class of professional men." 

The minimum salary for ministers, set by the Synod in 1868, was $600 per 
year. 

In that same year there were efforts in this country toward a larger union 
of denominations, but our church evidenced little interest in such. In November, 
1868, a Convention on Christian Union met in Philadelphia. Orange Presby- 
tery sent a consultant. For her action that Presbytery was severely criticized. 
A report in one of the Church papers read as follows: 

"The resolution to send a consultant to the convention (on Christian 
Union) was introduced (in Orange Presbytery) during the last hours 
of a long and laborious session when many of the brethren were ab- 
sent, when most of those present were anxious to go, and when there 
was neither time nor opportunity for full and general discussion. Its ad- 
vocates urged that the proposed convention was not a church court, 
that its actions would not be binding, and that its purposes were rather 
to promote Christian feeling and sympathy. They affirmed that the 
sending of a consultant committed us to no union of organization . . ." 

It is interesting that during the meeting of the General Assembly two years 
ago, in 1966, the same strategy and almost the same arguments were used to 
carry our denomination into the Coniultation on Church Union. 



19 



As the writer of the Book of Ecclesiastes says: 
What has been, 

Is what will be. 
And what has been done, 

Is what will be done; 
And there is nothing new under the sun. 

Of course, that is a rather pessimistic position and does not contain the whole 
of truth. But it is well to remember that much of what is happening has hap- 
pened before, that the troubles of our day are not really new. 

I repeat, we sometimes act as if the Church, the country and the world 
never experienced any troubled times, any crises before. It is quite comforting 
to discover that most of the things that worry us in 1968 and cause us concern 
were present a hundred years ago. 

In 1868 Mississippi was fighting a Supreme Court decision. At the Chicago 
Convention in that year there were challenges to the seating of the Southern 
delegations. The Republicans adopted a strong plank favoring "economical ad- 
ministration in government." The war against the Indians in the West was 
going poorly and was being condemned by some churchmen. A clipping from 
the Neiv York World noted the appalling increase in suicides. Another article 
deplored the rise of the divorce rate in the country. The communications media 
were under fire. The V'all Mall Gazette of London accused news telegraph op- 
erators of slanting the news of the impeachment trial of President Johnson. 
There were earthquakes in Ecuador and Peru which killed an estimated forty- 
thousand persons. There was a revolution in Spain, and China was in turmoil. 

A brief article in a church paper reported as follows: 

"A traveler from China speaks of the awful carnage wrought by the 
revolution in the Tae-Ping province. A belt 200 miles wide and 400 
miles long has been laid waste by the rebels, and is literally without 
human habitation." 

The London Record reported that as a result of the liturgical revival some 
persons were advocating the elimination of the sermon from the worship service. 
"The day of preaching," they said, "is ended." The church papers were de- 
bating the propriety of ministers accepting honorary degrees, and pastors were 
complaining that the affairs of Presbytery and synod were taking too much of 
their time. 

Even the jokes have not changed. From the North Carolina Presbyterian 
dated February 26, 1868, I copied this: 

"In Arkansas a man buying animal skins was conversing with a woman, 
at whose home he had called to buy furs. The man asked if there were 
any Presbyterians around there. The woman hesitated for a moment and 
then said that she guessed not, her husband hadn't killed any since they 
had lived there." 

A man told me that story a few months ago, but he set the scene, not in Ar- 
kansas, but in Bladen County, North Carolina. 

So the past teaches us, among other things, that our fathers and their times 
were no better and no worse than ourselves and our times. Their lives were 
no more virtuous, their churches no more vigorous, and their ways no less 



20 



troubled than ours. Thus, the study of history enables us to live in our genera- 
tion with joy, and hope, and faith, and to sing: 

O God of Bethel, by whose hand 

Thy people still are fed. 
Who thru this weary pilgrimage 

Have all our fathers led. 
Our vows, our prayers, we now present 

Before Thy throne of grace; 
God of our father, be the God 

Of their succeeding race. 

Having looked at the past, let us now 

2. Look briefly at the Future. Let us attempt to catch a glimpse of some 
of the things that may yet come to pass. 

We shall confine ourselves in this discussion to the Church and what we 
may expect to happen in her. For we have neither the time, nor has your speak- 
er the competence, to discuss the future of the nation and the political world. 

The one certainty about the future is that there will be many changes, 
many modifications of what we now have. There will be numerous alterations 
of things as we now know them. This applies to the Church as well as to the 
nation and the world. 

We must not let the similarities between the Church in 1868 and the Church 
to day blind us to the fact that many changes have taken place. And these 
changes give us some indication of what the future holds, for in all likelihood 
most present trends will continue. The course which past changes have taken 
can indicate the general direction in which future modifications will occur. 

One of the changes that has taken place has been in the area of doctrine. 
The Presbyterian Church today is far less rigid in its doctrinal stance than it 
was 100 years ago. Our fathers demanded more precise adherence to the West- 
minster Confession of Faith on the part of ministers, ruling elders, and deacons 
than we do today. We are quite lenient toward doctrinal deviations which our 
fathers would not have tolerated. In 1868 a ruling elder who did not present 
his children for baptism because he did not believe in the baptism of infants 
was deposed from his office. A candidate for ordination who questioned the 
doctrine of election was not ordained. 

Again, our Presbyterian Church's attitude regarding cooperative efforts and 
union with other denominations has undergone radical modification. There 
is far more openness toward other churches than there was a hundred years ago. 
As we indicated, Orange Presbytery was roundly criticized for sending a con- 
sultant to a Convention on Christian Union in 1868. Because of the criticism 
of its action, the presbytery, at its next meeting, felt constrained to incorporate 
into its minutes a lengthy explanation of the action in which the presbytery 
explicitly denied any inclination toward organic union with other denominations. 
Today, in contrast, our church is a full participant in the Consultation on 
Church Union and is very near to union with the Reformed Church in America. 
And it is confidently expected that this will lead to further unions. 

Thus, we see that changes have taken place in the last 100 years, and these 
indicate some of the things that are yet to come. For the future will undoubted- 
ly bring even fuller cooperation among denominations. Not only will there be 
more joint activities at the Assembly's level, such as the cooperative publica- 
tion of educational materials and the merger of many missionary activities, but 
there will be at the local level union parishes in which one minister will serve 



21 



a field of several small churches of different denominations. In the burgeoning 
cit'es denominations will unite in the support of persons to serve in specialized 
areas such as a ministry to hippies, to drug addicts, and to night club people. 
There will be joint efforts to serve the vast apartment complexes now being 
built. Such ministers will have no church building, but will gather small 
groups in private apartments for worship and study. To be successful such 
ventures must be ecumenically, and not denominationally, supported. 

Undoubtedly distinctions between denominations will continue to be blurred. 
Differences of theology will diminish until they all but disappear. Differences 
in modes of worship and in church government will persist, however, and or- 
ganic unions will be hindered more by policy than by doctrine. 

The Church will adopt new forms of ministries. The parish minister serving 
a local congregation will continue for many years to be the dominant form of 
ministry. But the Church will come to appreciate and to employ a variety of 
forms of specialized ministries, such as tent-maker ministeries, in which persons 
earn their own living at some secular occupation while sharing the life of and 
ministering the Word and Sacraments to a particular group. Institutional chap- 
laincies will increase and new forms will be discovered as the Church seeks new 
ways of sharing through word and deed the Gospel of Jesus Christ. 

Local churches will employ new methods of serving its community. Our 
fathers, 100 years ago, would never have sanctioned the support of a recrea- 
tional program by the Church. They would have been horrified at the thought 
of old First Church sponsoring a soft-ball team in a church league. Some per- 
sons today object to the participation of the Church in housing and employ- 
ment programs. But the Church will continue to seek and to employ such new 
ways of serving the various needs of men. And she will not again confine 
herself to men's "spiritual" needs, as she sought to do 100 years ago. 

Despite opposition, the Church will continue to fight poverty, to espouse 
the cause of the poor, as Her Lord commissioned her to do, and as the prophets 
of Israel did with vigor. Indeed, we may expect that in the next 100 years the 
race question will have passed, and the new issue will be poverty — welfare aid 
versus guaranteed income. In that struggle, as in the fight against racial segre- 
gation, the Church will play an important role. She will be criticized and di- 
vided because of her participation, but she will persevere. 

In the years to come, the Church will place less emphasis upon getting new 
members and more emphasis upon involving all its members in Christian enter- 
prises. This will be the new discipline of the Church. Right actions will become 
more important than right beliefs. There will be less concern for large numbers, 
and more concern for useful activity. We may, therefore, expect the percent- 
age of the national population which acknowledges membership in a church to 
be reduced. But we may also anticipate that the smaller group will be more 
influential in the transformation of society. 

Coming generations of churchmen will place even more emphasis upon so- 
cial justice, which is always the unfinished business of the prophetic church. 
In line with this, there is sure to come a new emphasis on political ethics which 
may foster a neo-puritan revival of sorts. 

Preaching in the churches in the years ahead will move away from expository 
and inspirational sermons toward doctrinal and apologetic sermons. Preachers 
will be required again to show the rationality of Christian doctrines and to give a 
reason for the faith that is in them. New forms of communicating the faith, such 
as drama and dramatic dialogue in the pulpit, will be more widely employed, 
but preaching will not lose its place in the church. The Christian faith is based 



22 



on historical events, and these events must be told by the spoken word, that is, 
by preaching. 

Sunday Schools as we know them today will play a diminishing role in the 
education of persons in the faith. New opportunities will be exploited through 
the released time of school children, and there will be more and more courses 
on religion in state supported colleges and universities. 

Attendance at the Sunday Morning Worship service will decline, there will 
be increased opportunities at other times and places to engage in worship and 
study in small groups. In all Hkelihood this will be the direction in which the 
form and structure of the Church will undergo modification. We need not 
fear such, for the form and structure of the People of God have changed from 
the family gathering of Abraham's day, to the Tabernacle of Israel in the 
wilderness, to the Temple in Jerusalem, to the synagogues of Jesus' day, to the 
house-churches of New Testament times, to the cathedrals and monasteries 
of the Middle-Ages, to the state churches of the Reformation era, to the village 
churches of England and Colonial America, to the large city and suburban 
churches of today. We need not fear what changes the future will bring. We 
may be confident that Jesus Christ is still the Head of the Church and He will 
enable her to adapt to the needs of the day. 

Now, of course while there will be many changes within the next 100 
years, there are some things that will not change. Jesus Christ will not change. 
The Word of God will not change. Our understanding of our Lord and of His 
Word will certainly undergo modifications and reinterpretation, but "the Word 
of our God will stand forever." 

And the need of man for the Gospel of Jesus Christ will not change. Within 
the next 100 years, human nature will not be altered in any substantial way. 
Will Durant, the noted historian, in his new book. The Lessons of History, ad- 
mits that he can find "no substantial change in man's basic nature in the un- 
countable centuries since he first appeared out of the murk of prehistory." All 
technological advances, Durant believes, can be written off as new means of 
achieving old and selfish ends. 

So, if our Lord delays His coming another 100 years, there will still be sin, 
and pain, and sorrow, and heartache, and death. There will be tasks which de- 
mand a strength beyond our own, and decisions which require a wisdom greater 
than our own. Indeed, with the increased ability to transplant vital organs 
of the body, to prolong life by drugs and heart pumps, to freeze human bodies 
at death for revival later; with the new knowledge which science will give of 
hormone control so that parents can determine many of the characteristics of 
a child before he is conceived — with all these options, decisions will be far more 
compHcated than the simple ones which you and I face today. So there will 
still be need for prayer and for faith, for dedication and for love. And there 
will still be a need for the blessed hope that whatever the future holds, Jesus 
Christ holds the future. 

3. Now, this is the confidence that enables us to live in the present, open 
to the future and to all the changes that will come. With the confidence that 
the future of the Church and the world is in the nail-pierced hands of Jesus 
Christ, we can rejoice in the bright prospects of tomorrow even in the darkness 
of contemporary times. 

This confidence, that God rules, makes us open to the changes which are 
taking place in our world. Indeed, the thing that the Christian fears as much 
as anything else, in himself and in others is an inflexibility of spirit, a rigidity 
of mind, which allows no change, which tolerates no new ideas or ways. Such 



23 



a spirit acts as if God were not a Living Being, as if He has said all that He has 
to say, and has done all that He intends to do in this world. The man who is 
opposed to all innovations, who resists every change in the status quo — that 
man does not really believe in a Living God. For all practical purposes, for such 
a man God is dead. 

And such an attitude of resistance to change can mean the death of our 
denomination. 

Samuel Ramos, the Mexican sociologist, in his book, Profile of Man and 
Culture in Mexico, observes that this inflexibility of spirit is quite prevalent 
in Mexican culture today. He sees its origin primarily in the medieval Roman 
Catholic Church, He says, 

"It was our fate (in Mexico) to be conquered by a Catholic theocracy 
which was struggling to isolate its people from the current modern 
ideas that emanated from the Renaissance (in Europe). Scarcely had 
the . . . colonies in Mexico been organized when they were isolated 
against all possible heresy. Ports were closed and trade with all countries 
except Spain was disapproved." 

As a result the Roman Church in Mexico all but became a fossil. Resisting 
all change she became hardened and ossified. But this is what will happen to 
any church, including the Presbyterian Church U. S., whenever it adopts a 
rigidity of spirit which is closed to new ways and to change. 

Openness to the living acting God is a hallmark of the Reformed Church. 
Our motto has been "The Reformed Church is always reforming." Under the 
judgment of the Word and confident that God is the Lord of history, Reformed 
Churches have always declared their willingness to alter their ways. 

The changes which we are experiencing in our church and in our country 
are not symptoms of sickness, they are evidences of life! The only organism 
which is not changing is one that is dead! 

Now, this certainly does not mean that we approve of or will embrace every 
suggested change as though it were the final will of God. But it means that we 
will retain an openness of mind, a willingness to venture, an ability to listen 
sympathetically to new ideas. It means that we will examine every movement 
with the best light that we have, giving our own testimony regarding it, regis- 
tering our support of or opposition to it when necessary, and casting our vote 
when the time comes for that. 

All changes taking place around us in the modern world are certainly not 
the active will of God for His people. There are many contemporary trends 
in the Church, the nation, and the world that cause me much concern. But to 
them all I shall remain open, because I have misunderstood them. I shall listen 
carefully to the exponents of each view= I shall give my own witness in relation 
to each. I shall oppose those I believe to be wrong, and I shall sponsor those I be- 
lieve to be right. But of this I am quite confident: if all these currents that 
disturb me come to full flood tide, the Kingdom will not fail nor falter; God 
will not be left without a witness in the earth, and through all these currents and 
out of every change God will bring good for His people. 

So, to all the evil forces of our time we can say, as Joseph in Egypt said to 
his brethren who had sold him into slavery,'' As for you, you thought evil 
against me, but God meant it for good" (Gen. 50:20). 

With this faith that God is the Lord of history, we are set free — free to live 
joyfully in the present, grateful for the past, and confident of the future. 



24 



With this confidence we are set free — free to act boldly in a world that 
is changing, free from the stupid idea that we can stop all the changes, free 
even from the desire to do so, free to participate responsibly in giving some di- 
rection to the changes. 

Now we can sing with meaning, 

This is my Father's world, 

O Let me ne'er forget 
That though the wrong 

Seems oft so strong, 
God is ruler yet. 

This is the God who comes each day to the gate of your life and mine; this 
is the Lord of history who offers us daily opportunities to share in the work 
that He is doing, in the changes that He is effecting, in the victory that He is 
getting; until with the saints and martyrs of all times we stand in that great com- 
pany before the thorne in heaven and shout, "Hallelujah, for the Lord God, the 
Almighty, reigneth; let us rejoice and be glad." 



25 




DR. HAROLD J. DUDLEY 
General Secretary 
Synod of North Carolina 



26 



HISTORY OF WILMINGTON PRESBYTERY 
. SYNOD OF NORTH CAROLINA 
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH IN THE UNITED STATES 

1868 - 1968 



By HAROLD JAMES DUDLEY 



(An address, delivered before Wilmington Presbytery, Synod of North Carolina, 
Presbyterian Church in the U. S., at the Centennial Meeting of the Presbytery, 
November 21, 1968, by the Reverend Harold J. Dudley, Th.M., General Sec- 
retary of the Synod of North Carolina, Presbyterian Church in the U. S.) 



27 




28 



Introduction 



The Church historian is confronted with several approaches in writing his- 
tory; through Geography, Chronology, Biography, Sociology, Philosophy, The- 
ology, and Events, including fact, fancy and phenomena, etc. When the work 
is a monograph, his task is compounded. What approach shall he make? What 
should be included, and conversely, what should be omitted? 

Needless to say, in preparing an address on the History of the Presbytery of 
Wilmington, Synod of North Carolina, Prebyterian Church in the United States, 
1868-1968, I have been confronted with the dilemma raised. Let it be under- 
stood, however, that once the choice has been made of an abridgement, even to 
an isolated field or subject, a comprehensive study along the way is still not 
ruled out before drafting the final document. In fact, such a production, with- 
out the definitive study, is likely to be the fruit of superficial research. 

For this reason, I have endeavored to make an in-depth study of the origin 
and early development of Wilmington Presbytery, by examining its embryo and 
roots, as well as its trunk and incipient branches. The study includes what 
preceded the Presbytery per se, as to geography and history of the area from 
the standpoint primarily of the Church, as well as the Presbyterian churches 
of the Presbytery down to the organization of the Presbytery in 1868. The 
study further delineates some of the ministers and lay personnel of the Church 
in the area involved from about 1736. 

The address delivered before Wilmington Presbytery on the occasion of 
its Centennial Celebration in the First Presbyterian Church, Wilmington, N. C, 
November 21, 1968, is an abridgement of a fuller text. 

In view of the fact that, so far as I know, this is the first attempt made at 
writing a rather definitive History of the Presbytery, it is unquestionably true 
that the basic documents have not all been examined exhaustively; for instance, 
records of all the churches of the Presbytery should be examined. I have read 
some of them. Much work might be done on County Court records and news- 
paper files though the latter are not always to be trusted. There is collateral 
research to be done on the Minutes of other Presbyteries and of the General As- 
sembly, not to mention the secular history of the area. The material is abundant 
and worthy of research for a Master's degree. No doubt, there is still material 
in "trunks in the attic." 

Let is be clearly stated that this document is not comprehensive in the sense 
that it is complete. There are omissions of persons, places, and events. Full 
justice can be done only if a much greater amount of time and study can be 
given to the subject than I have been able to give though that has been consid- 
erable. At this point, I wish to express appreciation to the members of my staff 
who have assisted in gathering and preparing the material. They are: Carrie 
Scogin, my Secretary; Sue Clary, Sallie Schurrer, Kathleen Mullen, Barbara En- 
nis, Wayne Smith, and Earl Cannon. Without their help I could not have com- 
pleted the document on schedule. 

I am deeply grateful also to Wilmington Presbytery for the invitation to 
present the address on the occasion of the Centennial of the Presbytery. To the 
Reverend Messrs. James Balfour Tubbs (descendant of the Revolutionary Patriot 
of N. C, Col. Andrew Balfour), Executive Secretary of the Presbytery, and Dr. 



29 



B. Frank Hall, minister of the Pearsall Memorial Church (whose forbears played 
a prominent part in the history of the Cape Fear) and Chairman of the Centen- 
nial Committee, I am particularly indebted. 

The research and study are complementary to the undertaking to which I 
committed myself some eight to ten years ago, namely the writing of the His- 
tory of the Synod of North Carolina, Presbyterian Church in the United States. 
The monograph on Wilmington Presbytery will be incorporated into that His- 
tory, either wholly or partially. 

It is hoped that this History will be provocative to loyal Presbyterians of the 
area, and that if they possess documents of value for implementing this study, 
they will make them available. It is also my hope that the History may prove in- 
teresting, instructive, and challenging to a large number of readers. 



HAROLD J. DUDLEY 



Raleigh, N. C. 
November 20, 1968 



30 



- WILMINGTON PRESBYTERY 

SYNOD OF NORTH CAROLINA 
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH IN THE UNITED STATES 
1868 - 1968 

I approach this task with a sense of emotion and sentimentaUsm — my mother 
was born and reared within a few blocks of this spot where we stand, on Janu- 
ary 18, 1869. She was a member of St. James Episcopal Church. She moved to 
Richmond, Virginia during the 1880's, where she married my father in 1890. 
One of my childhood memories relates to the annual visits to our home of my 
mother's godmother. Miss Hettie James (for whom I was partially named) and 
her sister. Miss JuHa James. I was brought up on reminders of the Cape Fear, 
Crepe Myrtle, and beaten biscuit. 

''So it was with the Synod's tree of Home Missions. Blighted by the 
War, it stood several years like a blackened trunk without hope of resus- 
citation. But all at once the pruned and blighted tree began to show fresh 
signs of life. In 1868 it sent out a bough towards the sea in the Presbytery 
of Wilmington, which was formed with the avowed purpose of evangelizing 
eastern North Carolina. "i 
Thus did Dr. R. F. Campbell, D.D. minister of the First Presbyterian Church 
of Asheville, N. C. describe the birth of Wilmington Presbytery to the Synod of 
North Carolina during its Centennial Celebration at the Alamance Presbyterian 
Church, October 7, 1913. 

In the same address Dr. Campbell described Synod's strategy for mission as 
"multiplication by division," "the cutting off of territory belonging to the older 
presbyteries to form new ones for the purpose of more thorough evangelization 
. . ." Dr. Campbell then quotes from Dr. Samuel Caldwell Alexander's "little 
book, 'Miracles and Events'," which gives "an interesting account of the struggle 
that took place over this question." 

A CROP OF Saints 

Dr. Alexander, a charter member of the Presbytery and its first evangelist, 
wrote: 

"Immediately after the War some of us thought it best to have Wil- 
mington Presbytery set up for the express purpose of evangelizing eastern 
North CaroHna. The proposition met with earnest opposition by some strong 
men in the Presbytery, who said it would be a waste of time and money to 
try any more to evangelize that country. They said we have sent men into 
that section of the state for forty years and nothing has been done. We 
answered that was because the men you sent into that wilderness ran in and 
then ran out; they did not stay long enough to raise a crop of saints. 
Dr. Campbell adds, "The night before Presbytery met was spent by Mr. 
Alexander in prayer — the only time in his life, he says, that he ever spent a whole 
night in prayer. The next day the opposition gradually melted away. The Pres- 
bytery decided by practically a unanimous vote to ask for the erection of the 
new Presbytery and Mr. Alexander was elected evangelist for eastern North Caro- 
lina. "3 It would appear that Dr. Alexander, more than any other, deserves to 
be called "the father of Wilmington Presbytery." 



31 



Dr. Campbell concludes his account of the polemic over Synodical Home 
Missions as follows: 

"The struggle for the setting off of Wilmington Presbytery was one of 
the decisive battles in the development of the Synod's policy of reaching 
the destitutions within its bounds. Since that battle was won the pres- 
byteries of Mecklenburg, Albemarle, Asheville, and Kings Mountain have 
been erected, and a movement for the creation of several additional pres- 
byteries has been inaugurated. "4 

SYNOD MEETS IN WILMINGTON— 1868 

The Synod of North Carolina helds its 5 5 th Session in Wilmington Novem- 
ber 18-21, 1868, apparently with meetings in the Presbyterian Church and def- 
initely in the Methodist and Baptist Churches. The resolutions adopted towards 
the close of the meeting expressed thanks to "the citizens of Wilmington for 
their hospitality and kindness to the members of this body, and also to the 
auhorities of the Methodist and Baptist Churches for the tender of their houses 
of worship . . ." without reference to a Presbyterian Church in Wilmington; 
however, the 1867 meeting of Synod had "adjourned to meet in the First Pres- 
byterian Church, Wilmington, N. C."5 

The Stated Clerk, the Rev. Jacob Doll, recorded that Synod had adjourned 
at New Bern the previous year to meet on November 4, 1868 but that the Rev. 
Archibald Currie, Moderator of Synod, postponed the meeting for two weeks, 
the reason being "the disturbed state of the country in view of the Presidential 
election" and "at the earne:t solicitation of 34 ministers and upwards of 5 0 rul- 
ing elders of the Synod. "6 

Mr. Currie, a native of Moore County, and at the moment pastor of the Gra- 
ham Presbyterian Church, preached the retiring Moderator's sermon from I John 
1:3. The Rev. Duncan Daniel McBryde, a native of Richmond County, at the 
time pastor of the Bluff Presbyterian Church, was elected the new Moderator. 

For our consideration here, the chief item of business of Synod occurred on 
Friday, November 20, 1868 in reference to the Committee on Bills and Over- 
tures which Committee made the following report, which was adopted: 

"The Committee on Bills and Overtures beg leave to report, that they 
have in their hands an overture from the Presbytery of Fayetteville, asking 
the Synod to erect a new Presbytery, by dividing the said Presbytery. The 
overture is in the following words: 

OVERTURE 

"The Presbytery of Fayetteville respectfully overtures the Synod of 
North Carolina to erect a new Presbytery in the eastern part of what is now 
Fayetteville Presbytery, with the following boundary, viz: 

"Beginning on the South Carolina line with the western boundary of 
Columbus County, and running thence along the western boundary of 
Bladen and Sampson Counties to the southern boundary of Orange Pres- 
bytery, and thence along that line to the ocean, and that the new Presby- 
tery thus erected be called THE PRESBYTERY OF WILMINGTON.' 

"This territory includes the following Ministers and Churches: H. A. 
Munroe, James Kelly, C. Shaw, S. C. Alexander, D. B. Black, H. L. Single- 
ton, B. F. Marable, James M. Sprunt, Luther McKinnon, and S. H. Isler; 
with Licentiates N. W. Herring, J. A. Woodburn, and Archibald McFad- 



32 



yen.'-' Churches Beth-Car, Ehzabethtown, Mount Horeb, Brown Marsh, 
Whiteville, White Plains, South River Chapel, Black River Chapel, Clin- 
ton, Springvale, Oak Plane, Union (in Duplin), Grove, Goldsboro, Beaver 
Creek, Catherine Lake, Rockfish, Mount Zion, Hopewell, Keith, Moore's 
Creek, Pike, Mount Williams, 1st Church Wilmington, 2d Church, Wil- 
mington. 

"A true extract from the minutes of the Presbytery of Fayetteville, at their 
sessions, held at Rockfish Church, Duplin County, N. C, November 17, 1868. 

J. P. Mcpherson, Stated clerk 

"Your Committee recommend, 

"1. That the Synod of North Carolina do erect a new Presbytery out 
of a part of Fayetteville Presbytery. The new Presbytery to be known by 
the name of THE PRESBYTERY OF WILMINGTON.' The following 
to be the dividing line between the two Presbyteries. 

"Beginning on the South Carolina line with the western boundary of 
Columbus County, running thence along the western boundary of Bladen 
and Sampson Counties to the southern boundary of Orange Presbytery, and 
with said line to the ocean. The new Presbytery to include the territory 
lying east and south of said line. The following members of Fayetteville 
Presbytery to compose the new Presbytery, viz: H. A. Munroe, James Kelly, 
Colin Shaw, S. C. Alexander, D. B. Black, H. L. Singleton, B. F. Marable, 
James M. Sprunt, L. McKinnon and S. H. Isler, with Licentiates N. W. 
Herring, J. A. Woodburn and Archibald McFadyen. Having under their 
care the following churches Beth-Car, Elizabethtown, Mount Horeb, Brown 
Marsh, Whiteville, White Plains, South River Chapel, Black River Chapel, 
Clinton, Springvale, Oak Plane, Union (in Duplin), Grove, Goldsboro, 
Beaver Creek, Catharine Lake, Rockfish, Mount Zion, Hopewell, Keith, 
Moore's Creek, Pike, Mount Williams, 1st Church Wilmington, 2d Church, 
Wilmington. 

"2. That the Presbytery of Wilmington convene for the first time, 
in the parlor of Mr. Patrick Murphy's house, in the city of Wilmington, 
N. C, on this afternoon, the 21st day of November, 1868, at JYz 
o'clock, and that the Rev. Colin Shaw preside as Moderator."/ 

FAYETTEVILLE PRESBYTERY 

Fayetteville Presbytery had convened in old Rockfish Presbyterian Church, 
near Wallace in Duplin County, beginning on Saturday, November 14, at 12 
noon, and continuing on Monday and Tuesday, November 16 and 17, immedi- 
ately prior to the opening of the meeting of Synod, at Wilmington, forty miles 
south, November 18. A primary item of business on the agenda of the Pres- 
bytery was the consideration and adoption of the Overture referred to above by 
a vote of 3 3 to 4. The retiring Moderator of Fayetteville Presbytery was the 
Reverend H. L. Singleton, 8 minister of the Wilmington First Church, who 
preached from Mark 8: 36-37, "For what shall it profit a man if he gain the 
whole world and lose his life?" He was succeeded by Dr. H. G. Hill, pastor 
of the Fayetteville First Church, and one of the most distinguished ministers of 
the Presbyterian Church during the latter half of the nineteenth century. For the 
record, it is important that present at that meeting of Fayetteville Presbytery 



"'He was the first licentiate ordained by Wilmington Presbytery. 



33 



were the following ministers and ruling elders who would soon be members of 

the newly-to-be-created Wilmington Presbytery. 

Ministers: Colin Shaw,9 D. B, Black, lo S. C. Alexander, H. L. Singleton, 
Hugh A. Munroe,ii S. H. Isler,i^ James Kelly,i3 B. F. Marable,i4 and Luth- 
er McKinnon.15 (Of the ten Charter members, only Dr. J. M. Sprunti6 
was absent. 

Elders (and churches): Brown Marsh — J. H. Balentine; Black River 
Chapel — James Innis; Mt. Zion — J. W. Boney; Hopewell — Benjamin F. 
Saunders; Rockfish — John W. Boney; Union — Dr. James H. Hicks; Keith 
— James Garrison; Mt. Williams — John P. Bannerman; Goldsboro — John 
Everett; Oak Plane — E. C. Smith; Moore's Creek — Aaron M. Colvin; Clin- 
ton — J. W. Wright. (12 of the 25 Charter Member Churches were rep- 
resented.) 17 

It is also important for the record to note the following representatives from 
Fayetteville Presbytery enrolled at Synod, who would on Saturday evening, the 
fourth and last day of the meeting of Synod, be at least vicariously among the 
Charter Member of the new Wilmington Presbytery: 

Ministers: H. A. Munroe, James Kelley, Colin Shaw, S. C. Alexander, H. L. 

Singleton, B. F. Marable, Luther McKinnon, and S. H. Isler. (Absent: D. B. 

Black, and James M. Sprunt) ; 

Ruling Elders: Neill Graham and William K. Cromartie, both members of 
the Mt. Horeb Church; George S. Carr, Mt. Zion; John McLaurin and 
J. C. Smith, both of the Wilmington First Church; S. Player, Mt. Williams 
and Richlands, and Patrick Murphy, Oak Plane. 18 

WILMINGTON PRESBYTERY ORGANIZED 

Pursuant to the order of Synod, the following ministers and ruling elders 
met in the parlor of Mr. Patrick Murphy's home in Wilmington at 7:30 p.m., 
November 21, 1868 for the purpo:e of organizing the new Presbytery of Wil- 
mington: 19 

Ministers: Hugh A. Munroe, Colin Shaw, S. C. Alexander, S. H. Isler, H. L. 
Singleton, James Kelley and Luther McKinnon (absent: D. B. Black and 
James M. Sprunt) ; 

Ruling Elders: Dr. Neill Graham, Mt. Horeb; J. C. Smith, First Church 
Wilmington; James Garrison, Keith; J. W. Wright, Clinton; B. F. Sanders, 
Hopewell; Dr. C. T. Murphy, Oak Plane; J. H. Murphy, Moore's Creek; 
S. Player, Mt. Williams; W. K. Cromartie, Smith River Chapel; (Churches 
not represented: Beth-Car, Elizabethtown, Brown Marsh, Whiteville, White 
Plains, Black River Chapel, Spring Vale, Union (in Duplin), Grove, Golds- 
boro, Beaver Creek, Catharine Lake, Rockfish, Mt. Zion, Pike, and Wil- 
mington Second). 

The Presbytery was constituted with prayer by the Rev. Colin Shaw, the 
Moderator appointed by Synod. The record thus indicates that at the time of 
organization there were ten ministers, three licentiates, 2 5 churches, and ap- 
proximately 1,150 members. 

One is impressed on reading the Minutes of the organizational meeting by 
the fact that everything was done decently and in order, that is by proper mo- 
tions. The Rev. James Kelley was chosen Clerk pro tem and the Rev. Luther 
McKinnon was chosen Stated Clerk of Presbytery at a salary of $5 per annum. 
Ruling Elder J. C. Smith of the First Church Wilmington was elected the first 
treasurer of the Presbytery. The Rev. B. F. Marable was chosen Agent of Evan- 



34 



gelism; the Rev. Hugh A. Munroe, Agent of PubUcation; and the Rev. S. C. 
Alexander, Agent of Foreign Missions. 

The Treasurer was directed to procure the necessary record books for himself 
and the Stated Clerk and to pay for the same from such Contingent Funds as 
might come into his hands. The Rev. Colin Shaw and ruling elders Dr. Neill 
Graham and Dr. C. T. Murphy were appointed a committee to assess each church 
in the bounds of the Presbytery the proportionate part of the Contingent Fund 
of the Presbytery, with instructions to report at the next meeting. The Messrs. 
H. A. Munroe and S. H. Isler, and Alexander Kirkland,'"' a licentiate of Orange 
Presbytery, were recommended to be Agents of Sustentation since they were 
said to "occupy missionary grounds in the bounds of the Presbytery." 

The Treasurer was instructed to receive from the Treasurer of the Presby- 
tery of Fayetteville the donation which that Presbytery had kindly made to 
Wilmington Presbytery. 20 

The Stated Clerk was ordered to have the Minutes, or an abstract of them, 
pubhshed in the "North Carolina Presbyterian." 

Presbytery adjourned, to meet next in the Presbyterian Church at Clinton, 
N. C. at 12:00 p.m. "on Thursday before the Sabbath in April next." 

SECOND SESSION OF WILMINGTON PRESBYTERY 

Beginning at the Clinton meeting in the spring of 1869, Wilmington Pres- 
bytery established the custom of devoting the first half hour of each day's ses- 
sion "to rehgious exercises." At this meeting Contingent Fund assessments were 
made on the churches ranging from $2 for Catharine Lake to $40 for the Wil- 
mington First Church. One of the first actions of this meeting was the de- 
termination "to omit all civil and military titles in the Minutes." At this meet- 
ing also a biographical sketch of the late Rev. Robert Tate was presented by the 
Rev. Colin Shaw and ordered "to be spread on the Biographical Sketch Book of 
Presbytery."^! 

Also at this meeting Presbytery overtured the General Assembly to amend 
the Book of Church Order in order to provide for every church having a rep- 
resentative at both Presbytery and Synod. The custom was for a field of two 
or more churches to send only one representative to these Courts. Presbytery 
instructed the Rev. Luther McKinnon to visit Fayetteville Presbytery to ask 
that Wilmington Presbytery might have "the privilege ... of having a voice 
in the election of Trustees of Davidson College." This was later satisfactorily 
arranged, agreeable to all parties. The first Commissioners sent by the Presby- 
tery to the General Assembly were the Rev. Colin Shaw and ruHng elder Dr. 
Neill Graham of Mt. Horeb Church. Dr. Graham was not present at this meet- 
ing of Presbytery though he had attended the first meeting. 

The first report on the State of Religion to the General Assembly made by the 
Presbytery was optimistic, declaring that the membership had increased, "show- 
ing that there is vitality in our churches and that God has not deserted the vine 
of his own planting." In reference to stewardship, it was reported that the Gen- 
eral Assembly Systematic Benevolence Plan had been adopted and that "as our 
people recover from their pecuniary prostration, they increase oblations to the 
Lord." With pride it was reported "that at our first regular meeting two candi- 
dates for the Holy Ministry presented themselves and were received under the 
care of Presbytery;" also that "the First Church in Wilmington has contributed 
to the cause of education $1,180." 



'•'Second licentiate ordained by Wilmington Presbytery. 

35 



A petition from Whiteville pled for support in building a church in that 
town where there was no church building, pointing out that there was no Pres- 
byterian Church, doubtless meaning building, in Columbus County. 

The Resolutions of Thanks, true to the custom of the day, expressed appre- 
ciation "to the officers of the different railroad companies for furnishing the 
delegates with return tickets. "22 

FROM THE "APPENDIX" 

In the Appendix for this meeting under "Sustentation Report," appears the 
statement that the General Assembly was urging all churches to adopt and use 
the "system of contribution by the envelope plan" on the grounds that this 
method of stewardship would insure an amount sufficient to carry on "all our 
operations without resorting to special collections." The Agent, the Rev. H. L. 
Singleton offered it as his opinion that "by system and uniformity, we can un- 
questionably obtain sufficient to meet all demands of the Gospel in our own 
bounds and contribute liberally to fields beyond us." 

The Report of the Agent on Foreign Missions, the Rev. S. C. Alexander, said 
he felt called upon to "set forth the facts as they are" and declared that the 
giving to this cause was "discouraging and shameful." After seventeen of the 
twenty-five churches he wrote the word "nothing" but indicated that six 
churches had given in amounts ranging from $1 to $130 in the case of the 
Wilmington First Church. He waxed quite eloquent in making his appeal for 
a more generous response. He said: 

"For the purpose of carrying the glad news of salvation to a dying 
world, such a response should make the crimson come on cheeks of minis- 
ters, elders, deacons, and private members throughout our bounds. Thor- 
oughly we have been asleep. And when the divine call is heard from the 
millions of China, of India, of Japan, and from the heathen world, saying 
'Come over and help us,' we have paid no attention thereto. We have al- 
lowed unnumbered millions of heathens to go down to the grave — to go 
down to hell, without ever trying to save their immortal souls. 

"Many of our churches have not contributed a single dollar, not even 
one cent to dispel the moral darkness of the heathen world." 
He goes on to say that more recently the picture was brighter and that some 
churches had trebled their contributions. He presented a resolution which was 
adopted, requiring elders, deacons and ministers to bring the matter of foreign 
missions ''prominently before the churches every Sabbath, from the first of May 
to the first of July." 

Thus doubtless was laid the foundation for the reputation which this Pres- 
bytery later attained as a leader in the General Assembly in the field of Foreign 
Missions. 

The Rev. B. F. Marable, the Agent for Education reported a larger number 
of young men preparing for the ministry than ever before, about 200 in the 
General Assembly, and with pride he pointed out that "notwithstanding the 
great poverty of the country, the Church is able to render assistance to every 
candidate who may need pecuniary aid in his educational course." 

EARLY PRESBYTERIANISM IN NORTH CAROLINA 

Six nationalities contributed to the establishment of Presbyterianism in North 
Carolina: the English, the French, the Swiss, the Scotch, the German, and the 
Waldensian (or ItaHan). Presbyterians belong to the Reformed bodies of Prot- 



36 



estantism, of whom there are more than 5 0,000,000 in the world. In North 
Carohna there are four distinct Reformed bodies, the largest of which is the 
Presbyterian Church in the United States with more than 160,000 members. 
There are more than 14,000 members of the United Presbyterian Church, most 
of whom are Negroes. 

FIRST CAPE FEAR SETTLERS 

There were Presbyterian settlers in the States from the beginning, including 
George Durant, the first permanent settler in the Albemarle Sound section, who 
dates back to 1663. A number of the first settlers, including several Governors, 
were Scotsmen, ^3 and possibly Presbyterians. The increase of population was ac- 
companied by Scot merchants, and the early records would indicate that a few 
Scot people infiltrated the wandering immigrants. But it was not until the 
18th century that Scots of the Highlands and Scotch-Irish from Ulster settled 
in sizeable numbers. Wm. Henry Foote has creditably traced the arrival of the 
Scots in the Cape Fear, beginning about 1730, with the coming of Alexander 
Clark from Jura in the Hebrides. ^4 He found kinsmen from his native land al- 
ready here in the persons of Hector McNeill, John Smith and his son and daugh- 
ter, Malcolm and Janet (the famous Jennie Bahn), and others. 

The first permanent Scotch-Irish settlement in North Carolina was that in 
New Hanover County (now Duplin), near the present site of Kenansville, in 
1736. Among those who settled there were the ancestors of the late William 
Rand Kenan, Jr., the railroad magnate and North Carolina University benefac- 
tor, who was born in Wilmington, and whose paternal grandparents, five gene- 
rations removed were Thomas and Elizabeth Kenan, who settled in Duplin 
County about 1730. 

Grove Church at Kenansville is regarded as the oldest Presbyterian "Society" 
in North Carolina, though Old Black River Church at Ivanhoe has the distinc- 
tion of being the oldest organized Presbyterian Church in the State, 1740. 

Highland Scots emigrated directly to North Carolina, arriving at Wilmington 
and points farther north and west on the Cape Fear and its tributaries. After 
the famous Battle of Culloden, 1746, large numbers of them arrived every year 
down to the Revolutionary War. 

MINISTERS LATE ARRIVING 

Presbyterian ministers were late in coming to North Carolina. It was not 
until 1770 that the first minister arrived from Scotland in the person of the 
Reverend John MacLeod. Meanwhile itinerant missionaries were sent by presby- 
teries from the North, to wit, Philadelphia and New York, organized respective- 
ly in 1706 and 1717. There is slim evidence that the Reverend Francis Makemie 
might have stopped briefly on the shores of North Carolina about 1700, but 
where is not certain. The first Reformed minister to settle in the state was the 
Reverend Claude Phillipe de Richebourg, a French Houguenot, who sojourned 
briefly at New Bern until that colony of Swiss and French were dispersed as a 
result of the Tuscarora War of 1711. There are names of Ruling Elders on the 
rolls of the early records of your churches, and even still today, which bear wit- 
ness to the dispersion of those early Swiss and French settlers: e.g., Boney, Bor- 
deaux, and Fountain, to name only a few. 

The first Presbyterian missionary from the North to itinerate in North 
Carolina was the Rev. William Robinson, a native of England, who came to 
New Jersey in 1729, following a youth of dissipation. He studied at the famous 

37 



Log College; and was sent as a missionary to North Carolina by the Synod of 
Philadelphia. While not much is known of his journey, Foote is the authority 
for the statement that the definitely visited in New Hanover (and Duplin) 
Counties. ^5 

FIRST SETTLED MINISTERS 

The next Presbyterian minister to visit the Cape Fear country was the Rev. 
Hugh McAden of Pennsylvania, sent out by the Synod of New York. Beginning 
on July 29, \75 5, he made a tour of nine months preaching to both the Scotch- 
Irish who had settled the Piedmont, and the Scots and Scotch-Irish of the terri- 
tory now embracing Wilmington Presbytery. Beginning on about Tuesday, Jan- 
uary 13, 1756 until approximately April 13 he was in the Cape Fear country, 
preaching at many spots where today there are Presbyterian churches. He arriv- 
ed in Wilmington on about February 14, and on Sunday, February 15, according 
to the entry in his Diary, he preached "in the A.M. to a large and splendid audi- 
ence, but was surprised when I came again in the P.M. to see about a dozen met 
to hear me." Foote says that "this depressed his spirits and hastened his departure 
from the place on the Tuesday following. "^6 

Two years later in 175 8, he returned to Duplin County in order to become 
pastor of Grove near Kenansville, Rockfish near Wallace, and the Welch Tract 
near Burgaw. Ten years later he removed to Caswell County where he died 
shortly before the arrival of the British, who destroyed his home near Semora 
and exhumed and desecrated his body. 

ARRIVAL OF JAMES TATE 

The next minister in the Cape Fear was the Reverend James Campbell, 
a Gaelic-speaking Scot from Pennsylvania, who was persuaded to settle among 
the Scots who had emigrated to the upper Cape Fear country around and above 
Fayetteville. This was in 175 8, and it was not until 1770 that another Pres- 
byterian minister settled in the Cape Fear country. He was the Reverend John 
MacLeod. Meanwhile, in 1760 there arrived in Wilmington the Reverend James 
Tate, an Irish minister, who established a classical school there, one of the 
earliest, and possibly the first Presbyterian school in the state. He conducted 
worship services in either private homes or in the courthouse at Front and Mar- 
ket Streets. Foote tells us that he educated many of the young men in New 
Hanover who took an active part in the Revolution. In due time he became 
a staunch Whig and was for a time a member of the Committee of Safety. On 
account of his sympathy with the Colonies, he was compelled to take refuge 
in the Hawfields where he again conducted a school. 

EXCELLED IN MISSIONARY WORK 

In the History of Home Missions in Wilmington Presbytery, it is said that 
Mr. Tate's real purpose "seems to have been to do missionary work in the sur- 
rounding country, in as much as there was no opportunity to preach the Gospel, 
as a Presbyterian minister, in Wilmington." It is further recorded that he made 
frequent trips to the churches at Black River and South River and to the Pres- 
byterians of Duplin County. The account concludes: "He was our SECOND 
MISSIONARY, and his name and influence are still preserved in our section. "27 
The Rev. Robert Tate who later preached at Black River wrote most favorably 
of him, and related that he visited from house to house, teaching and baptizing 
the children, and that it was the custom to pay him one dollar for each child 
baptized, or in lieu of that to be presented with homespun. 2 8 



38 



It has been thought that he never transferred his membership to an Ameri- 
can Presbytery; however, Dr. George Howe, in his History of South CaroHna, 
reports that the Reverend James Campbell had charged Mr. Tate with Arminian- 
ism before South Carolina Presbytery, which had been organized at Charleston 
prior to 1700. Happily he was exonerated of the accusation. ^9 

Mr. Tate never married nor did he ever accept a call to be a pastor of a 
church; nevertheless, he was known for his courtesy and winning ways, especial- 
ly with the young people. 

EARLY CHURCHES30 

There were no Presbyterian churches in the towns of North Carolina before 
1800, the year that a church was first organized in Fayetteville. The earliest 
churches in the territory which became Wilmington Presbytery in order of 
organizations are, or including some now dissolved, were Black River 
Chapel, 1740; Grove, 1756; Rockfish, 1756; Brown Marsh (dissolved, succeed- 
ed by Clarkton in 1872), 1756; Moore's Creek (which became Caswell in 18 58), 
1788; Union (which became Faison — 1870), 1793; South River, 1796; Hope- 
well, 1800; Keith (dissolved, 1926), 1817; Wilmington First (1760), 1817; 
Beth-Carr, 1819; Shiloh (dissolved — became Clinton, 1 8 5 5, then Graves Memo- 
rial 1908), 1831; Hunt (dissolved, 1839), 1833; Elizabethtown, 1834; Mount 
Edwards (dissolved 1865), 1847; Mount Horeb, 1843; Mount Williams (dis- 
solved, 1962), 1845; White Plains, 1850; Pike (merged with Rocky Point, 
1960), 18 56; Whiteville, 18 56; Caswell (this was originally Moore's Creek, 
1788), 185 8; Mount Zion, 1858; Wilmington Second (later St. Andrews-Coven- 
ant), 1858; Oak Plain, 18 59; Goldsboro, 18 59; Catharine Lake, which became 
Richlands (dissolved, ), 1868; Seminary, (became Pollocksville, 1892), 

1868. 

I would be remiss if I did not recount here briefly some of the history of 
several of the oldest churches. There were eight of them by 1801. 

BLACK RIVER CHAPEL3 1— 1740 

Black River Chapel, as it was designated for many years, is located in lower 
Sampson County near Ivanhoe. It is older than Sampson County, and for that 
matter than all the counties which make up the Presbytery except Craven ( 1712) , 
Carteret (1722), New Hanover (1729), Onslow (1731), and Bladen (1734). 
The settlers here were Scots. The first building for worship was of logs, located 
near Corbett's Ferry. There was no heat within for want of a chimney. Trans- 
portation was difficult for want of roads and a sufficiency of horses. Travel was 
afoot, or by "walk and tie," whereby a mother and her small children rode a 
distance while the father and older sons trudged far behind. The mother would 
at length dismount and tie the horse, and then proceed by walking. The father 
and sons would soon come on the animal, and ride a distance past the mother 
before dismounting, typing the horse, and proceeding on foot. Many walked 
the entire distance to church, sometimes as far as five miles or more each way. 3^ 
Those who possessed "Sunday go-to-meeting shoes" carried these in their hands, 
walking barefoot until they reached "stands," set up especially for shodding 
those who boasted foot-gear, whose squeaks shortly thereafter heralded their 
arrival as they marched unceremoniously down the aisle of the chapel. 

TIE MAINTAINED WITH SCOTTISH CHURCH 

It is unbelievable that it was 1790 before this Church was able to secure a 
resident minister; nevertheless, it thrived on spasmodic preaching by itinerant 



39 



ministers. Among them were James Tate. William Bingham Dougald Craw- 
ford,.^- James Hall 3^ and Samuel E. McCorkle.36 k is said that the Church 
was for a time under the jurisdiction of the General Assembly of the Church of 
Scotland. It IS noteworth}" in this respect that many of the Scots who arrived 
from the Isle of Arran between 1770-1774 brought their Church letters with 
them. 3 > 

The Church suffered several fires, and the early records of the Church were 
destroyed in a fire which razed the home of Joseph M. Beatty, presumably the 
Clerk of the Session. 39 

There have been three churches, built respectively in 1740, (rebuilt in 1770), 
1~1S, and IS 59, the present building.-- 

The Community prospered down to the War Between the States, and it is 
said that it was rich in 1 8 59, appraised at one and a half million dollars. 41 
Much of this, however, was estimated in slave property. 

BICEXTEXMAL CELEBRATIOX 

In 1940 the Church celebrated its bi-centennial. More than 2,000 persons 
were present for the occasion. The Reverend R. Murphy Williams, Sr. of 
Greensboro, a descendant of one of the founders of the Church, delivered the 
anniversary sermon, following which a bronze tablet was unveiled commemorat- 
ing two centuries of continuous service, given by Charles J. Williams, Jr., in 
memory of his great, great grandparents, Patrick and Elizabeth Murphy. 

The Church has produced many distinguished citizens, as the names of the 
early settlers will testify: Corbett. De\'ane, Kerr, Beatty, Murphy, Alderman, 
Henry, Robinson. Colvin. MacMillan. Bannerman, Kelsos, Shaw. Doane, Mc- 
Allister. McCurdy. and Robinson. Others were MacFie. Hendry, Siller, Seller, 
Currie. MacKillips. MacVurchis. Fullarton, and MacLouie. 

PRODUCED PROMIXEXT CITIZEXS - _ 

One of the early persons who deserves to be remembered is Ruling Elder Wil- 
liam Robinson, who arrived in 1771. It is said that he, a wealthy man for his 
day. on arrival, visited every family in the community and presented each one 
with a gift, such as z calf, or pig, or chickens, bacon, eggs, etc. 4- The same 
authority for this story reports that Catherine MacDuffie Kerr, the wife of 
Daniel Kerr, an immigrant of 1774, brought acorns from the Isle of Arran, and 
planted them at the old plantation, "Punch Bowl." It is said that there are 
many beautiful oaks presently standing on the plantation, and that others 
have also sprung up as new acorns were taken to distant places, including the 
campus of East Carolina University. -3 

Among the distinguished men to go out from this community were E. A. 
Alderman, later a member of the Wilmington First Church, who became famous 
as an educator. He was president of the University of Xorth Carolina, Tulane 
University, and the University of Virginia. 44 It is said that the Murphy family 
has contributed more doctors to X'orth Carolina than any other, among them 
Dr. Patrick Livingston Murphy, famous for ''mental diseases" before psychiatry 
had attained prominence. 45 

TOKEX AXD COMMUXTOX SERVICES 

Until about the time of the Civil War the celebration of the Lord's Supper 
was a time of great solemnity. In somie churches it was customary o begin prep- 
aration for Communion on Friday, and one or more ministers would arrive from 



40 



other churches to assist the local minister in ministering to the large crowds 
that often were present for these occasions. By or on Saturday it was customary 
for the Session of the Church to dispense tokens to those members of the Church 
who were in good standing. Only those presenting tokens might commune. On 
Sunday there would be at least two services, each morning, noon and night (six 
in all) going on simultaneously — one within the church and the other under a 
shelter, nearby. The custom prevailed in miany churches of spreading long tables, 
and having the people approach them in successive groups, to partake of the 
bread and wine. In some churches, the rule was rather rigidly enforced that no 
church member was allowed to partake of the communion unless he had attended 
the preparatory services the week prior to the event. 46 

MINISTERS 

The first minister called to Black River, who accepted and was installed, 
was the Reverend Colin Lindsay, a Scotsman who arrived in North Carolina 
about 1788. He preached at Black River from 1788 to 1792, and then served 
a series of churches in Fayetteville Presbytery down to the time of his death in 
1817. He was one of the most colorful men of his day.47 

He was followed by the Reverend Samuel Stanford, 48 who later was Mod- 
erator of the Synod of North Carolina. Foote says that Stanford "extended his 
labors over the greater part of Duplin as a minister, and conducted a classical 
school with success." This school was doubtless at the Grove. Foote adds that 
"Mr. Stanford wore out his strength and days in the service of the people of 
Duplin, and finished his course in the year 1828.49 Robert Tate was pastor here 
from 1799 to 1834. 50 

GROVE— 1756 

The original settlement was several miles from Kenansville and was known 
as the "Golden Grove." Presbyterianism in North Carolina first saw the light 
of day there. The settlers here were Scotch-Irish, which explains the fact that 
Hugh McAden settled among them. The Highlanders spoke Gaelic, which he 
did not speak, and the preachers to those settlements of necessity spoke Gaelic. 
James Campbell was persuaded by Hugh McAden to settle in the upper Cape 
Fear country for this very reason. Stress was early laid on education here, and 
from the earliest times there was a school, manned and maintained by Presby- 
terians. Usually the minister of the Presbyterian Church was the principal of 
the nearby academy. Among the prominent families here were the Kenans, Halls, 
and Sprunts. The most famous teacher was probably Dr. James McKenzie 
Sprunt.5 1 

Other ministers who preached here were the Reverend Messrs. James Tate, 
John Robinson, 5- Samuel Stanford, who was pastor for 33 years, while also 
serving as school principal, Alexander Mclver,5 3 and Malcolm Connaly Camp- 
bell. 54 

ROCKFISH— 1756 

Ministers who preached at this church intermittently during the early years 
were William Robinson, Hugh McAden, John Robinson, 5 5 and S. D. Hatch. 5 6 
Robert Tate seems to have been the first installed pastor, beginning in 1799. He 
served until 183 8. The Rev. Angus Johnston supplied during an illness of Mr. 
Tate's. 57 Other ministers prior to 1868 were Avander Mclver,58 Henry Brown, 59 
and Duncan Blue Black, 60 who served 46 years. 

Some of the oldest Church records in the Synod are extant for this Church, 
dating from 1814. Camp Meetings were regularly held on the grounds of the 



41 



church. From time immemorial it has been customary to hold communion in 
this church on the fourth Sunday of May. One of the oldest "Female Missionary 
Societies" in the General Assembly was organized here in 1817, and the records, 
still extant, are the oldest of any church in our denomination. 6 1 Robert Tate 
presided over his first communion as a young minister, in this church. Only six 
persons participated. They were Timothy Boodworth and his wife, Thomas Wil- 
son and his wife, and Robert Tate and his wife. The Church celebrated its 200th 
Anniversary October 12-14, 19^6. 

BROWN MARSH CHURCH— 175 6 

This Church has a history similar to the others. As one reads the Minutes 
of Wilmington Presbytery he is saddened by the unfortunate circumstances 
which necessitated the dissolution of this Church; however, in its demise during 
the years 1870-1872, the new Church of Clarkton was born. It is of great inter- 
est to visit the old Church and cemetery. On the ceiling may be read in chalk, 
what is believed to have been written there by the builder of the old church: 
"Thomas Sheridan — 1828 . . . Success to John Q. Adams." Sheridan was the 
builder, and doubtless favored Adams over Andrew Jackson, who was elected 
that year as president of the U. S. 

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH COURTS 

Francis Makemie arrived in Virginia and Maryland in 1690, and largely 
through his influence Presbyterianism became established in America. The 
first Presbytery was organized in 1706 and the first Synod in 1717. In 1741 
there was a division in the Church, known as the Old Side-New Side Controversy. 
This was healed in 175 8 but in the meantime Hanover Presbytery had been set 
off in 175 5. Fifteen years later in 1770 Orange Presbytery was created, and in 
178 8 the Synod of the Carolinas was organized in Old Centre Church in Con- 
cord Presbytery. The first General Assembly met in 1789. Concord Presbytery 
was organized in 1796. FayetteviDe Presbytery and the Synod of North CaroHna 
were organized in 1813. Several Presbyteries were both organized and dissolved 
in 1868, the year Wilmington Presbytery was organized. It will be seen that 
the territory embracing Wilmington Presbytery has been a part of some five 
different Presbyteries (Philadelphia, New Castle, Hanover, Orange, and Fayette- 
viUe). 

EVOLUTION OF WOMEN'S WORK 

Hardly anything in the History of the Synod of North Carolina is more 
thrilling than the development of Women's Work, and Wilmington Presbytery 
stood foremost in this endeavor. The emancipation of women in the Church 
ran concomitantly with their emancipation throughout society. As you know, 
it was not until 1963 that our denomination gave women equal rights with men 
to hold offices in the Church. For many years women were forbidden to speak 
aloud in Church assemblies, not even to pray, and of course, official women's 
organizations were not sanctioned. As long ago as 18 50 there appeared in the 
N. C. Presbyterian, under the pen name only of "L.N.," an article entitled, 
"Women's Rights," in which the author declared that "women's rights are 
equal with men's in the sight of God." While most churchmen decried such 
"modernism," there were a few who were bold enough to espouse the cause. 
Among them was Dr. Peyton H. Hoge^^ of the Wilmington First Church, who 
gave every encouragement to Mrs. B. F. Hall, 63 who gained the title of "Mother 
of your Presbyterial Court." 



42 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN UNION 



Women's Missionary Societies had existed since 1817, when the Women of 
Rockfish organized, but it was not until May 30, 18 88 that the Missionary So- 
cieties of the Presbytery were banded together as a Presbyterial Union. That 
took place in the First Presbyterian Church, Wilmington, and Mrs. Hall was 
elected the first President, which office she held until 1900. It was during the 
18 bo's and 1890's that this Presbyterial and that of Fayetteville were working 
towards Union. The Wilmington organization was the second in the General 
Assembly. The Presbyterial was organized with eleven societies and 228 members. 

It would not be until 1912 that organization would be accomplished along 
Synodical lines, for the opposition persisted; however, Mrs. Jackson Johnson64 
and Mrs. W. M. Cummin6 5 of Wilmington, and others, saw victory in sight 
and realized the fulfillment of their dream that year. Mrs. Johnson was elected 
the first Synodical President. 

YOUTH ORGANIZED BY WOMEN 

Women of the past century were thinking and planning "the Mission of the 
Church" long before some of our modern theologians concocted the phrase. 
They have been reaching out for decades. Their outreach in Wilmington in- 
cluded the fields of Youth Work and World Missions. In reference to the 
former, the service rendered by Mrs. L. W. Curtis, daughter of Mrs. Jackson 
Johnson, and her daughter Lillian Curtis (Painter) was new for the Presbyterian 
Church, progressive, and inspiring. Mrs. Curtis was wife of Dr. L. W. Curtis, 
evangelist for Fayetteville Presbytery, who had served as a missionary in Laos. 
She was the first Secretary of Young People's Work of the Synodical of North 
Carolina. Miss Curtis, under the aegis of the Board of Christian Education (old 
Committee), developed the former Kingdom Highways program of our denomi- 
nation. The Wilmington Presbyterial Union was the first in the Synod to em- 
brace Young People's Work. 

GREAT MISSIONARY PROGRAM 

The other facet of Women's Work which shines with splendor in this 
Presbytery relates to World Missions. When the Presbyterial was organized in 
1888, the purpose was stated to be "To support and cheer our lady missionaries 
in the field." Funds the first year totalled only $273.75, hardly sufficient to 
support one missionary in the field; however, the great mission program of the 
First Presbyterian Church, Wilmington, substantially augmented the women's 
contribution; in fact, so much so as to provoke a letter from the then Secretary 
of Foreign Missions of the General Assembly, who in 1890 wrote: "Your 
Synod is taking the lead in our Foreign Mission work." By 1910 fifteen mis- 
sionaries had gone forth from Wilmington Presbytery. 

It has been said on excellent authority: "Possibly the most remarkable work 
done by any Presbyterial in our Church was the building, equipping, and support 
of Kiangyin Hospital in China by Wilmington Presbyterial. "66 

PROGRAM OF HOME MISSIONS 

It should not be forgotten that Wilmington Presbytery was also a leader 
in the Home Mission Program. Dr. Campbell in his centennial address in 1913 
illustrated the change in the philosophy of Synod in regard to Synodical missions, 
using Wilmington Presbytery as the example and proof of its effectiveness. As 



43 



a result of preliminary steps and plans by those dedicated to the new philosophy, 
growth and development took place in the eastern part of the state. Dr. Camp- 
bell said that the "y^^^ 1881 deserves to be marked with red, or to speak in 
accordance with the color scheme of Presbyterianism, with ultra-marine letters 
on the Synod's calendar." He refers to the meeting of Synod that year in 
Goldsboro where the Rev. Messrs, H. G. Hill, Luther McKinnon, and C. M. 
Payne, who either were in the eastern part of the state or to be there, and others, 
offered a paper advocating "That Synod itself undertake by Synodical effort to 
reach the unevangelized parts of the state." This he added was "so radical and 
dangerous a proposition that only after a hardfought battle . . . did victory perch 
on the banner of the progressives. "67 He then, praised the Rev. B. F. Marable 
of Goldsboro, who at the Goldsboro meeting of 1888, in the "most memorable" 
debate "in the history of the Synod," said, "He sometimes wondered whether 
the Synod of North Carolina could be saved if it were an individual. Not the 
members of the Synod, mind you, but the Synod. Can anybody be saved that 
does nothing to save his fellowman. But in all my knowledge of this Synod, I 
have never known it to do anything to save one human soul. Why is this? Not 
because the members are not alive in the matter of saving souls, but because 
the Synod has formed the wrong idea of its functions. It has believed itself to be 
merely a body of review and control! And every year 150 ministers and elders 
leave their homes and their work merely as a body of review and control! To 
review what? To review the records of five presbyteries. To control what? To 
control Mecklenburg Presbytery! "68 

WORLD MISSIONS 

Perhaps no one has better than the Rev. Andrew J. Howell69 of this Pres- 
bytery summed up its contribution to missions. In an historical address on "The 
Record and Progress of the Synod of North Carolina from 1861 to 1936," de- 
livered at the meeting of Synod on September 2, 1936, he pointed out that the 
"interest of the Synod in Foreign Missions has always been particularly noticeable. 
The contributions from its churches for this cause amounted to $165,949.00 in 
1920; $261,287 in 1925; and $239,683 in 1930. He further pointed out that 
the First Church Wilmington was known all over the General Assembly for its 
great work in Foreign Missions, and as of that date 22 foreign missionaries had 
been sent out from the bounds of Wilmington Presbytery while at that time 
there were 24 men and 45 women serving in the foreign fields from the Synod 
of North Carohna.70 

CONCLUSION 

Though this paper is far from complete, it is time to bring it to a close by 
other appraisals. Akin to the program of missions, was the perennial concern for 
evangelism, and there were never meetings of Presbytery during its early years 
when this was not a favorite topic. From the appointment of the Rev. S. C. 
Alexander, as its first evangelist, this has been a theme of the Presbytery. 

STEWARDSHIP CONCERN 

The records of the Presbytery will indicate that the Presbytery has always 
been deeply concerned for stewardship and there were times when it was the 
leader in the Synod and in contributions to World Missions, the leading Presby- 
tery in the General Assembly. The Presbytery believed in a philosophy of stew- 
ardship, based on scripture, and refused to go along with the Assembly during 
its early days in reference to strccsing that the tithe is a binding law. 



44 



In the field of education, the Presbytery was never wanting. There were 
numerous classical schools in the area, manned and maintained by Presbyterians, 
beginning as early as 1760 when James Tate arrived in Wilmington. In the 
Christian Education Program, the Sunday School was ever foremost in the plans 
of the Presbytery. There was an organized Sunday School at Rockfish as early 
as 1829, doubtless one of the oldest in the Synod. From the earliest days, the 
Presbytery urged that Sunday School Conventions be held each year. It is note- 
worthy that conferences for deacons and elders were also encouraged. The teach- 
ing program for children and young people was ever uppermost m the minds 
of the constituents of the Presbytery. 

FEW CASES OF DISCIPLINE 

There have been only a few instances of the Presbytery being involved in liti- 
gations. The first was in reference to the Brown Marsh Church, in connection 
with the contumacy charge against the Rev. H. A. Munroe, who insisted on 
preaching there after the church had been dissolved. As we have seen, this 
ended irenically. 

In 1904 a complaint reached Synod against Wilmington Presbytery. For a 
number of years Synod had urged that ministers, finding suitable colored per- 
sons desiring to become Presbyterians, to act as evangelists and receive them into 
the church at large, and then recommend to a colored church willing to re- 
ceive them. Wilmington Presbytery followed this procedure, and when an ef- 
fort was made to attach a colored member to a white church, the Presbytery 
still followed the pattern of Synod; however, a complaint was made stating that 
such action was unconstitutional and made color a test for membership. Synod 
upheld the action of the Presbytery, but the complaint was taken to the General 
Assembly and sustained. 

This is not to say that the Presbytery was indifferent to or not concerned 
for work among the Negroes. The records indicate quite the contrary. 

Throughout the Minutes, one is impressed with the spirit of fair play as was 
the case in dealing with the Rev. H. A. Munroe. One is also impressed by the 
fact that there was a passionate love for Jesus Christ and a passionate love for 
man. The Presbytery Minutes everywhere indicate concern: (1) "To do things 
decently and in order;" (2) To glorify God; and (3) To carry the Gospel to 
every creature. 

PRESBYTERY SYMBOLS 

Wilmington Presbytery is a symbol of missionary zeal and endeavor; a 
symbol of innovation and leadership; of faith and hope; of earnest effort and 
success. 

You have practiced "the mission of the Church" through sacrifice and 
service and through reconciliation. 

May your history be an inspiration to others, and may you increase in wis- 
dom, and in stature, and in favor with God and man. 

FOOTNOTES 

IR. F. Campbell, D.D., "The Last Fifty Years — The Presbyterian Church an Evangelistic Agen- 
cy," Centennial Addresses, Synod of North Carolina, delivered at Alamance Presbyterian 
Church, Greensboro, N. C, October 7, 1913 p. 59. Dr. Campbell himself was a strong be- 
liever in the philosophy of "multiply by dividing." Later he was a leader in establishing first 
Asheville Presbytery and later Appalachia Synod. 

^Quoted from S. C. Alexander's "Miracle and Events," without reference page being given. 
Samuel Caldwell Alexander was born in Mecklenburg County, N. C, February 24, 1 830, 



45 



son of Robert Davidson Alexander and Abagail Bain Caldwell. He married Mary Holmes 
Brown of Davidson, N. C, May 21, 18 57. He recieved the B.A. and M.A. degrees from Da- 
vidson College, 1848, and attended Columbia Theological Seminary, 1 8 5 3. He was ordained 
August 3, 1 8 53 by Concord Presbytery. He was pastor of Thyatira and Back Creek Churches 
from 1 8 53-1 8 59; then served as pastor of the Black River Chapel from 1 8 50 to 1870. In the 
latter year he became the first evangelist of Wilmington Presbytery, in which office he served 
from 1870 to 1873. Presbytery elected him in 1871 to serve for five years but he accepted 
a call to the Wadesboro Church in 1873 and remained there to 1878. From 1881 to 1883 
he served again in Fayetteville Presbytery, then left the Synod to serve in order in Texas, 
Missouri, Alabama, and Arkansas, where he died September 9, 1907. He wrote several brief 
works. Lafayette College in Alabama conferred on him the degree of Doctor of Divinity. 
^Thc Presbytery was Fayetteville which convened off and on for a week, November 14-21. 
An Overture was adopted by the Presbytery, Tuesday afternoon, November 17, 1868; there- 
fore, it was the night of November 16 that Dr. Alexander spent in prayer. The record in the 
Minutes of Fayetteville Presbytery' (November 14-21, 1868, pp. 52 5ff.) on this matter 
is as follows: 

"After Recess Presbytery met." 
"Division of Presbytery" 
"The following Resolution was adopted by Ayes thirty-three. Noes four, viz.: Resolved, 
That it is expedient that this Presbytery be divided, and that the following Overture on this 
subject be adopted and forwarded to Synod at its next session: 

"The Overture as amended is as follows, viz . . ." (The Overture appears later in the 
text of this paper.) At its foot appears the following: 

"[Ten Ministers; Three Licentiates, Twenty-five Churches]" 

^Mecklenburg was organized in 1869; Albemarle in 1 889; Asheville in 1 896; and Kings Moun- 
tain in 1902. Winston-Salem and Granville were organized in 1923. 

^Minutes of the Synod of North Carolina, 1 868, p. 22. Minutes, 1867, p. 16. 

^Minutes of Synod, 1868, p. 3. In the Presidential election of that year, the candidates were: 
Ulysses S. Grant, Union-Republican Party, (Vice Presidential candidate — Schuyler Colfax) ; 
Horatio Seymour, Democratic Party, (VP candidate — Francis P. Blair, Jr.). Grant was 
elected by a popular vote of 3,013,421 to 2,706,829 (52.7% to 47.3%). 214 electoral votes 
to 80. Twenty-three electoral votes were not cast since Mississippi, Texas, and Virginia, on 
account of Reconstruction difficulties, did not participate in the election. A paramount issue 
of the campaign was the program for the Reconstruction of the former Confederate states, 
with the Republicans in favor of harsh measures. — "How We Elect Our President," pub, 
by the Reader's Digest, 1968, p. 17. 

'^Minutes of Synod, pp. 13-14. The text of the Overture and the action of Synod are identical 
with the minor exception of the omission of the word "and" before "2nd church, Wilming- 
ton," in the last line of the 3rd paragraph. 

The Boundary of Wilmington Presbytery has remained essentially the same since 1 868. The 
most significant change was the transfer of Goldsboro to Albemarle in 1889. The Minutes 
of the Presbytery are interspersed with Resolutions and responses to Resolutions to and from 
higher courts in reference to changes. In 1870 Synod refused to change the boundary between 
Orange and Wilmington Presbyteries but ordered the Stated Clerk to define it more clearly. 
In 1871 Carteret County was transferred from Orange to Wilmington. Orange petitioned 
Synod, meeting at Goldsboro in 1 888, to provide it some relief in bearing the burden of so 
extensive a territory, especially among the 44 counties in the north-eastern sections of the 
state, where there w^ere 20 counties without a Presbyterian Church. The Orange Presbytery 
pstition was implemented by a memorial presented to Synod from the Home Mission Conven- 
tion which had been held in Goldsboro just prior to the meeting of Synod, urging a more 
equal distribution of territory of Synod among the Presbyteries. Synod appointed a Commit- 
tee to study the whole matter and report back in October, 1 8 89. The Committee reported, 
and Synod acted by creating a new Presbytery, to wit, Albemarle. The action included the 
transfer of that part of Craven County south of the Trent River to Wilmington Presbytery. 
A special Committee, composed of Dr. Frontis H. Johnston, Synod Evangelist located at Ra- 
leigh, Dr. Lauchlin C. Vass, minister of the New Bern First Church, and Ruling Elder James 
L. Fowle (presumably a kinsman, though not his father, of Dr. James L. Fowle, native of 
Washington, N. C, and for many years minister of the First Presbyterian Church, Chatta- 
nooga, Tennessee) , was appointed to formulate and recommend the procedure in constituting 
the new Presbytery. The Rev. S. H. Isler and the Rev. J. C. McMullen (father of the late 
renowned Dr. Robert J. McMullen, Educator and Missionary, who died at Chapel Hill, N. C, 
December 2 6, 1962), were transferred to the new Presbytery. Mr. Isler had transferred from 
Wilmington Presbytery to Orange between 1 883 and 18 84. All of Lenoir County was 
placed in Albemarle in 1911; however, in 1919 a six-mile strip of the east side of Lenoir 
County was transferred to Wilmington. In 193 2 the boundaries of Fayetteville and Wilming- 
ton were changed so as to include all of Samson County in Wilmington. 



46 



In reference to the Charter Member Churches, consult the Map of Wilmington Presbytery 
— 1 868. Also, there is in the APPENDIX to this paper, a resume of the History of each 
of the 2 5 Charter Member Churches of the Presbytery. 
8The Rev. Horace Leonard Singleton was born at Portsmouth, Va., December 27, 1 833, son 
of Henry and Mary Ann Reynolds Singleton. He married Martha Colgate Morling of Balti- 
more, Md., October 20, 1863. He attended Amherst College and Princeton Theological Sem- 
inary. He served in Missouri before going to Baltimore in 1862. In 1 86 5 he was called to the 
First Church, Wilmington, N. C, where he remained until 1871, when he became editor of 
Good News and Alliance, at Baltimore. Later he served briefly in Missouri again, and died 
in New York City, July 13, 1910. For an excellent account of the depressing conditions in 
Wilmington following the War, as given by him, see his letter to the First Church Congrega- 
tion, Dec. 6, 1892, in \Memorial of the First Presbyterian Church, Wilmington, N. C, 7')th 
Anniversary, 1817-1892, pp. 4145. 
^At this time he resided at Black River Chapel, Ivanhoe, N. C, and was the Stated Supply of 
the following Churches: Hopewell, Keith, Moore's Creek (Caswell), and Mount Williams. 
He was born at Fayetteville August 16, 1812, son of John Shaw and Frances Faison. He was 
graduated from the University of North Carolina in 1 837 with an A.B. degree. He attended 
Union Theological Seminary in Richmond, 1 83 8-39 and Columbia in S. C. in 1840-41. He 
was ordained by Fayetteville Presbytery December 19, 1846. He served Black River, 1841-48, 
South River and group, 1849-62. He became Confederate Army Chaplain with the 18th 
N. C. Regiment in 1862, and in January, 1 863 was transferred to the 51st Regiment, with 
which he served until the close of the War. According to Clark, N. C. Regiments, CSA, Vol. 
IV, 608 and 617, he was "appointed to this Regiment [l8th] by the State Legislature early 
in 1861, and served one year. Became Chaplain of the 51st Regiment January 1, 1 863, and 
served through the War . . ." "A soldier writes of him: 'He was an ardent Confederate, a good 
Chaplain, and a brave and most excellent man." He was living at Magnolia, N. C. in his 8 3rd 
year. When Sherman's Army invaded the Cape Fear in 1 86 5, it is said that, "with some 
prior knowledge of the military activity of the Shaw brothers," same of his "bummers" "mark- 
ed the Colin Shaw home for the torch; and it is authoritatively related that his daughter 
Mary, afterwards the wife of Dr. C. S. Kerr, to show her patriotism for the cause in which 
her father was serving, and her contempt for the vile assassins of the home, quietly sat at the 
piano and played 'Dixie' as a final serenade." — John A. Oates, The Story of Fayletteville, 67 5f. 
He served as Stated Supply and evangelist of Moore's Creek-Keith group foom 1866-1884; 
Gravel Hill group, 188 5-1886; Oak Plain-Mt. Zion group, 1886-1887; Magnolia group, 1887- 
1896; without charge and supply work, 1897-1904; died at Ivanhoe, N. C, July 8, 190 5. He 
was present at the 100th anniversary of the Battle of Moore's Creek Bridge and offered the 
prayer, February 28, 1876. — John W. Moore, History of N. C, vol. i, 427. 

Mr. Claude Hunter Moore of Turkey, N. C, did a full story on him for the Sampsonian, 
published in Clinton, N. C, date of December 23, 1 965; and the Fayetteville Observer for 
Sunday, January 9, 1966, carried a similar story replete with pictures. There also appears 
a biographical sketch of him in the N. C. Presbyterian for January 16 1896; and another, 
based on the Moore article on him in the same paper for August, 1966, pp. 8-9. His maternal 
grandfather was one of the pioneer settlers of Duplin County. John Shaw migrated from the 
Isle of Jura, Scotland, in 1747, to Cumberland County. Besides Colin, he had three other 
children: Ann, Elias Faison, and Henry Faison. The family has numerous connections scat- 
tered across North Carolina, particularly eastern N. C, and beyond. Colin Shaw was mar- 
ried in 1842 to Phoebe Bannerman of Kerr, N. C, in Sampson County, and to them were 
born: Washington Irving, Frances Mary (Molly), Phoebe, who died young, Hem.an, who also 
died young, Neil Graham, Henry Elias, William, and Leslie. 

^^Information is meager on Mr. Black. He was born in Moore County, N. C. (n.d.). His 
parents are not known. He seems to have attended some academy and was a student at 
Union Theological Seminary, 1840-1843. He was licensed by Fayetteville Presbytery, 1843, 
and ordained December 21, 1845. He served in order in Fayetteville and Wilmington Pres- 
byteries the following churches: Hopewell and Mt. Williams, 1846, and Rockfish, 1847; Keith, 
1849; Hopewell and Rockfish, 1 8 54-1 8 59; Pike, 1860 — (also S.S. Hopewell and p. Rockfish, 
71 )— 1 883 ; Hopewell, 1871-1891. He died August 20, 1893. In 1 868 he was residing at Bur- 
gaw and was serving the Pike and Rockfish churches. — Ministerial Directory, 1941, p. 57; 
and General CatalogJie, Union Theological Seminary, 1807-1924, p. 70. 

llHugh A Munroe (also spelt Monroe): He was born at N. C. in 1812, 

parents names not available. He married (1) Lucy Wright, of ; and (2) 

Caroline Matilda Wooten of Bladen County. He attended Donaldson Academy at Fayette- 
ville and Columbia Theological Seminary at Columbia, S. C, 1837-1840. He was licensed 
and ordained about 1842 by a S. C. Presbytery, and served in Bethel Presbytery, 1842-1843. 
He became an evangelist at Elizabethtown, N. C, Fayetteville Presbytery, in 1844, and the 
next year is reported without charge. He served as Stated Supply at Beth Car, 1846 — (Stated 
Supply at Mt. Horebj 1846-1848) — 1849; Stated Supply of JBrown Marsh and Elizabethtown, 



47 



1849, and Pastor, 1 8 50 — (SS at White Plains, 1 8 5 1-1 8 59) — 1 862 ; Stated Supply at White- 
ville and group, 1863-1874. He died at White Hall, Bladen County, October 26, 1874. When 
the Presbytery was organized he was residing near Clarkton and was serving White Plains 
and Whiteville. 

■2S. H. Isler was born in Jones County, N. C, August 3 1, 1 883, son of Simmons I. and Barbara 

Isler. He married Elizabeth Williams of He 

graduated from the University of North Carolina with the A.B. and M.A. degrees in 1 8 59, then 
attended Union Seminary in Va., 1 8 59-1 862, where he majored in Greek. He returned to 
eastern N. C. and was ordained as an evangelist by Fayetteville Presbytery April 10, 1 863. 
He spent the rest of his ministry serving in eastern North Carolina, as either Stated Supply 
or Pastor of the following churches and as evangelist, first in Fayetteville Presbytery, then 
Wilmington, and finally Albemarle: Goldsboro, Beaver Creek, Cobb's Mill, Catharine Lake, 
Seminary, and Richlands. He died at Goldsboro, a member of Orange Presbytery to which 
he had transferred about 1890, April 3, 1910. His ministry touched a large number of the 
churches which were organized during the period he served in eastern North Carolina. — 
Ministerial Directory, 1941, p. 347; UTS Catalogue, p. 87. 

^James Kelly was born near Carthage, N. C, April 1, 1 83 2. He married Emma Cromartie, 
near Elizabethtown, N. C, May 14, 1872 (d. March 24, 1873). He was a first honor gradu- 
ate of the University of North Carolina, with the B.A. degree, 1860. He served in the 
Confederate States Army until 1 863 when he began the study of Theology under a private 
tutor. He was licensed to preach on October 8, 1 863, and was ordained by Fayetteville Pres- 
bytery on November 1 8, 1 86 5. He served as Stated Supply at Jackson Springs, 1863-1864; 
Brown Marsh and Mt. Horeb, 1864, and as pastor, 1865-1877. He was President of the 
Leland, S. C. Female Seminary from 1877 to 1 880. He served as Stated Supply of the Eliza- 
bethtown and White Plains Churches from 1 880 to 1890 while at the same time filling the 
Office of Superintendent of Education for Bladen County. From 1 8 88 to 1892 he was also 
principal of the Clarkton High School, and in 1 803, he taught school. He was without 
charge from 1894 to 1900. He died at Clarkton April 19, 1906. When Wilmington Pres- 
bytery was organized he was Pastor of the Brown Marsh and Mt. Horeb Churches. — Directory, 
1941, p. 369. 

■^Benjamin Franklin Marable 11 was born at Halifax, Va., October 7, 1831, the son of 
B. F. and Susan Boswell Marable. He married Octavia Augusta Faison of Sampson County, 
April 7, 1863. He was a student at Richmond College in Virginia and Wake Forest College 
in North Carolina. He attended the Baptist Theological Seminary at Greenville, S. C, 1 8 5 5- 
18 56, and Columbia Theological Seminary. He was ordained by the Baptist Church in 1 8 56. 
and both preached and taught. He served as Recording Secretary of the Baptist State Conven- 
tion of N. C. from 1 8 57 to 1863. He was received by Fayetteville Presbytery from the Bap- 
tist Church December 16, 1863. He located at Warsaw, N. C. and served as supply of churches 
in that area until 1 8 65 when he became Pastor of the Oak Plane and Springvale Churches, 
1 865-1 868. He was Stated Supply at Clinton from 1868 to 1 875 and pastor at Goldsboro from 
1876 to 1879. He was Stated Supply at Mt. Olive and Clinton from 1 880 to 1892. He died 
in 1892 or 1 893. Hampden-Sydney College conferred on him the degree of Doctor of 
Divinity. 

Note that first of all he was a Baptist Minister. The memory of him has been passed on 
to the second generation after him, for as late as March 9, 1963 the writer was told by Miss 
Emma Walker Hubbard of Clinton that Dr. Marable was "a colorful character, and that 
sometimes he tried to conduct the Presbyterian Church by Baptist procedures, and that this 
often resulted in some 'rough times' for him." He had a tremendous hand in shaping the 
future of the Synod of North Carolina at the meeting of 1 888. — Directory, p. 429. 

^Luther McKinnon, one of the most distinguished ministers in the Synod of North Carolina dur- 
ing the last half of the nineteenth century, was born near Maxton, N. C. in 1840. (Exact 
date and parents' names not available.) He married Miss Addie Lee of Clinton, N. C, Decem- 
ber 1 5, 1869. He graduated from Davidson College with an A.B. degree in 1861, and from 
Columbia Theological Seminary in 1864. He served as a Chaplain in the 3 6th N. C. Regiment, 
CSA from the spring of either 1 863 or 1864 (See Directory, 1941, p. 473 and N. C. Regiments, 
1861-65, Vol. IV, p. 613) till the surrender. He was President of Floral College and Stated 
Supply of nearby Centre Church in Robeson County 1865-1866. He was licensed in 1864 
and ordained in 1866 by Fayetteville Presbytery. He served as Pastor of the Goldsboro Church 
from 1866 to 1871, and became a charter member of Wilmington Presbytery which he served 
as Stated Clerk in 1871. He was called to the First Presbyterian Church, Concord, N. C. in 
1871, and remained there until 1873 when he was called to the First Church, Columbia, S. C. 
From there he was called to the Presidency of Davidson College. In 18 88, on account of in- 
firmity he moved to Clinton, N. C. where he lived until his death. May 28, 1916. The Uni- 
versity of N. C. and Southwestern at Clarksville, Tennessee, conferred on him the honorary 
degree of Doctor of Divinity. 



48 



l^James Menzies Sprunt was born in Perth, Scotland, January 14, 1818. He was educated in 
Edinburgh. From 1 83 5 to 1 839, he was a merchant in the West Indies. He came to America 
in 1 83 9 and settled in Duplin County where he taught school for about five years at Halls- 
ville. In 1 845, he became Principal of the Grove Academy at Kenansville, and in 1848, he 
became affiliated with the Presbyterian Church and was taken under the care of Presbytery 
as a Candidate for the Ministry. He held the position as Principal until 1860 when he became 
Principal of the Kenansville Female Academy. He was licensed to preach on October 13, 1849, 
and was ordained by Fayetteville Presbytery and installed as Pastor of the Grove Church, 
Kenansville, May 3, 1851. He served as a Chaplain in the Twentieth N. C. Regiment, CSA, 
having been commissioned in June, 1861. He served through 1 8 63, and it is recorded: "His 
friends in the army can never forget him. He walked hundreds and hundreds of miles. Per- 
haps, none ever saw him on a horse or in an ambvilance during the War. The devout, scholarly 
man preached in his beloved Duplin, to the delight of the people till the close of his long and 
useful life." (From Clark, N. C. Regiments, op. cit., pp. 608f.) 

After the War, he returned to Kenansville and served the Grove, Union, and Mt. Zion 
group of churches to 1884. 

He was married to Eleanor Hall, one of his first pupils. He first lived in the "Jones resi- 
dence," but later purchased the "finely-built Gillespie house," which he made a place of 
beauty, the exterior as well as the interior since he was a horticulturist. 

He served as Duplin County Court Recorder for a number of years. He was Stated Clerk 
of Wilmington Presbytery from 1872-18 84. He died December 6, 1884, and was buried 
in the Old Hall-Sprunt Cemetery at Hallsville. (Information found in Directory, 1941, p. 
678; newspaper clipping for July 13, 1961 in Synod's Office file on Grove Presbyterian 
Church; letter of March 22, 19 52 from Miss Susan E. Hall of Wilmington, in Synod's Office 
file.) 

^'^Minutcs of Fayetteville Presbytery, pp. 52 5ff. 

'^^Minutes of Synod, 1 868, p. 4 Of these, the names of Carr, McLaurin, and Player appear fre- 
quently as representatives of their respective churches at meetings of Wilmington Presbytery; 
and Murphy, spasmodically. He was the first member of Wilmington Presbytery to serve as 
a Trustee on the Board of Union Theological Seminary in Virginia. For several meetings there 
was confusion as to whether or not Presbytery or Synod was responsible for paying his travel- 
ing expenses to Richmond to attend Board meetings. Synod disclaimed responsibility, and ap- 
parently either Presbytery paid his expenses, or he did himself. 

In the two lists of Ruling Elders who attended the Presbytery and Synod meetings are 
prominent family names, and, indeed, prominent personages. No doubt, information is extant 
on most of them. We would be remiss not to take further note of the following: 

Patrick Murphy: John A. Oates, Story of Fayetteville, p. 679: (1801-1874). "Patrick Mur- 
phy, son of Robert Murphy and Mary Bailey, was born on his father's farm near Tomahawk, 
May 9, 1801. He attended Grove Academy, Kenansville, and was largely self educated. He 
studied law, was admitted to the Bar and practiced for a time in New Hanover County, which 
he represented in the House of Commons in 1829. He moved to Taylors' Bridge Township, 
Sampson County, and in 1 83 3, married Eliza Ann Faison, and erected a large two-story home 
on Quwhiffle Creek, where he raised a large family. This original home still stands and 
is known as the Amos J. Johnson place. In 1 83 8, he was appointed Clerk and Master of the 
Equity Division of the Superior Court of Sampson County, a position he held for more than 
twenty-five years. He represented Sampson County in the lower branch of the General As- 
sembly during the war years of 1864 and 1865. He was a prominent layman of the Pres- 
byterian Church, and was one of the first elders of Shiloh Presbyterian Church in 1 83 2, par- 
ent of the Clinton Presbyterian Church. In 1 8 59, he was instrumental in the organization of 
the Oak Plains Presbyterian Church, in Taylor's Bridge Township; and it was at the home 
of Patrick Murphy, in Wilmington, to which town he moved after the War, that the Wilming- 
ton Presbytery was organized November 21, 1 868. He died November 1 5, 1874, and is 
buried at Oak Plains Church, Sampson County. An oil portrait of Patrick Murphy, presented 
by his grandson Charles Williams, of Jacksonville, Florida, hangs in the Superior Court Room 
at Clinton." 

John McLaurin: He was a prominent merchant in Wilmington, and was a Ruling Elder 
in the First Presbyterian Church. He was born in 1832 and died in 1907. He represented his 
Church at the last meeting of Fayetteville Presbytery before it was divided in order to create 
Wilmington Presbytery. According to James Sprunt, in Chronicle of the Cape Fear, p. 159, 
Mr. McLaurin "was proud of his Scottish lineage." Mr. Sprunt paid the following tribute to 
him: "He possessed those sterling traits of heart and mind which likewise adorned the lives of 
many of his fellow-countrymen in the Cape Fear region — 'absolute dependableness in all think- 
ing and in all dealing, a lively sense of justice, a cultivated taste, critical judgment, with a 
splendid capacity for moral indignation.' He was an honor to his city and Commonwealth." 

He was educated in the Odd Fellows School in Wilmington, conducted by Robert McLauch- 
lin, of Baltimore, a member of the first graduating Class. 



49 



In November, 1874, he bo'uglit the proprietary riglits to the Norfb Carolina Presbyterian 
which had been established and printed in Fayettevillc since January 1 , 1 8 5 8. He became both 
editor and owner. Mr. Sprunt says, "Mr. McLaurin, who was one of our most exemplary 
Christian citizens and a gentleman of fine attainments, continued its publication in Wilming- 
ton for about twenty-five years, when he sold it to a Charlotte Publishing company, which 
disposed of it later to Dr. A. J. McKelway of Charlotte, where it is published as the Presby- 
terian Standard." (ibid., p. 5 59.) 

One other observation by Mr. Sprunt: ". . . he wrote for the local newspapers some charm- 
ing reminisccnses of Wilmington in the forties over the pen name 'Senex,' Jr." (ibid.) 

A granddaughter of Mr. McLaurin's, Mrs. Catherine J. Pierce, lives in Charlotte, 1968. In 
1965, she graciously furnished Synod's Office, Raleigh, N. C, with a picture of Mr. McLaurin 
and also a receipt for a subscription to the C. Presbyterian, bearing his signature. 

Mr. McLaurin was the third Treasurer of Wilmington Presbytery. He was elected in the 
spring of 1 87 5. He addressed Albemarle Presbytery in 1 8 89 at its opening session, on The 
N. C. Presbyterian. 

l^The house, which was located at 8 North Fourth Street, is no longer standing, having been 
razed within the last few years. Pictures of the house may be found at the Historical Founda- 
tion, Montreat, N. C, and in the Office of the Synod of North Carolina, Presbyterian Church 
in the U. S., Raleigh, N. C. 

^^Minntes of Fayetteiille Presbytery November 21, 1868, p. 549. It is recorded in the narrative 
of the third adjourned meeting of the Presbytery, held during a recess of Synod on Saturday, 
supra, that the Stated Clerk of the Presbytery was directed to transmit to the Stated Clerk 
of the Presbytery of Wilmington which had been ordered by Synod to be organized "all items 
of business on our Minutes devolving upon members of that Presbytery." 

2lThe Reverend Robert Tate, who died at the age of 93, had the longest ministry in Fayetteville 
Presbytery at the time of his death. He was born at Hawfields in Alamance County, May 3, 
1774. He was educated at Old Caldwell Institute in Greensboro. Information on his formal 
education beyond this point is unavailable. He preached his sermon for licenture by Orange 
Presbytery in the Hawfields Church, April 6, 1796, and was licensed the following day. He 
seems to have moved almost immediately to the territory of Duplin and New Hanover (that 
part of the latter now Pender) Counties, where he spent the remainder of his life, serving the 
Hopewell, Rockfish, Mt. Williams, Keith, Brown Marsh, and possibly other churches, at in- 
tervals. He organized the Hopewell and Mt. Williams Churches. In regard to the Brown 
Marsh Church he served one year, and the Session Book records at its end, April 3, 1 828 that 
he preached his "valedictory sermon." (p. 10) He was a charter member of Fayetteville Pres- 
bytery and was elected its Moderator five times. The Minutes of the Brown Marsh Church 
state that he assisted the Rev. Samuel Stanford in administering the Lord's Supper on March 
20, 1814. (p. 4) Incidentally, in the History of the Hopeivell Church, by Mattie Bloodworth, 
1962, it is stated that he held his first communion at Old Rockfish just over the Pender line, 
"which would imply that it was an organized congregation of six persons: Hon. Timothy 
Bloodworth and his wife, Timothy Wilson and his wife, and Father Tate and his wife." Why 
just six people, she does not say. 

In reference to Timothy Bloodworth, he later moved to Wilmington, where he became in- 
terested in politics. In 1 803, Orange Presbytery was to have convened in Wilmington to 
license him to preach, but the death of his wife precluded this. One source, which may not 
be reliable, states that Robert Tate married twice and that his first wife was the daughter of 
Timothy Bloodworth, one-time collector of customs at Wilmington, and one-time member of 
Congress. This has been challenged however, by some of his descendants, including Mrs. Ida 
Brooks Kellum, of Wilmington. (Letter of March 16, 1966 to Mrs. Arnold Edgerton, of Golds- 
boro, both descendants through the Boneys.) Mrs. Kellum states that she has always won- 
dered where the proof came for Tate marrying Margaret Bloodworth, and adds, "I presume 
it is so, but these early recorders of such facts of history never carry any proof and per- 
sonally I have not run into any record in New Hanover County to indicate such ... I do know 
that Margaret was a favorite Bloodworth name . . ." Mrs. Kellum also gives rather conclu- 
sive proof that Robert Tate died in 1866, rather than 1867, citing proof from his gravestone. 
He lived on his plantation about five miles over the line in Pender County on Sill's Creek 
where today are located a part of the Penderlea Homestead Farms. He was buried in the 
nearby family cemetery. An excellent portrait of him appears on page 14 of History of 
Wilmington Presby ferial Auxiliary. It is recorded that he was "beloved and honored in 
many congregations." (Min. of 175th Anniversary meeting of Orange Presbytery, 3 52nd ses- 
sion, p. 43 0). He wrote "A Short and Imperfect Sketch of the Rise and Progress of the 
Black River Church, Commonly Known by the Name of the Black River Chapel," and there 
is a letter from him to the Editor of Sprague's Annals of the American Pulpit, p. 421, delineat- 
ing the character of the Rev. John Mclntyre, who was long a distinguished member of Fayette- 
ville Presbytery, and his contemporary, written when he was 83 years old. (Vol. IV, pp. 4201.) 



50 



22ln the Resolutions at the close of the Meeting of Fayetteville at Rockfish Church, November 14- 
21, 1868, appears an expression of "thanks" to the officers of the Steamboat lines on the Cape 
Fear River and three railroads for providing transportation at one-half fare. 

23Governors Gabriel Johnston and Arthur Dobbs, to mention but two. 

24Wrn. Henry Foote, Sketches of North Carolina, pp. 125ff; 158; 224. 

25ibid., p. 15 8. 

26ibid., pp. 17lff. His itinerary, as given in his Diary, which appears rather fully in Foote, 
and extant nowhere else as far as is known, indicates that "On Tuesday, January 13th, 1756, 
he set out on a journey down the Cape Fear River to Wilmington, in company with a Mr. Van 
Clave, and reached Huary, thirty miles, and preached the next day." Thereafter, the next day 
"he reached Smith's, at the Sandhills, and remained to Sabbath." On Monday he rode off 
with Mr, Smith who was going to court "and rode fifty miles to McKay's." Next day he 
rode thirty miles to Anson Courthouse, where he met an old friend, James Stewart, with 
whom he resided until Saturday when he rode to the New Store. On Sabbath, the 2 5th, he 
rode to Hector McNeill's, "and preached to a number of Highlanders, — some of them scarcely 
knew one word that I said, — the poorest singers I ever heard in all my life." He reached 
David Smith's on Little River and Alexander McKay's on the Yadkin; then Neill Beard's, 
James Semes's where he visited a sick family; to Mr. Robinson's, an affable gentleman," 
Justice Randale's, George Brown's, Neal Shaw's, Duncan McCoulsky's, Esquire McNeill's; to 
Baldwin's on the White Marsh, to Mr. Kerr's home, and on Wednesday, February 1 1 "he set 
out for Wilmington, and rode thirty miles to young Mr. Granger's," "a very discreet gentle- 
man who entertained me with a great deal of courtesy." On Thursday he rode fifteen 
miles to President Roan's; and the next day fifteen miles further to the ferry, and then 
crossed by water, four miles, to Wilmington." 

2Vlnformation on him may be found in the paper, "The History of Eastern North Carolina and 
the First Presbyterian Church of Wilmington, N. C," by Harold J. Dudley, by consulting 
the Index. (In the shorter version, fn. 22-27; in the longer version, 23-30.) 

28Robert Tate, "A Short and Imperfect Sketch of the Rise and Progress of the Black River 
Presbyterian Church, Commonly Known by the Name of the Black River Chapel." p. 2. 

29Howe, History of the Presbyterian Church in S. C, Vol. I, 3 82. Howe's authority is the 
Diary of the Rev. Alexander Simpson. 

SOSpace and time for this address prevent even a brief resume of all these churches; however, a 
resume of them will appear in the Appendix of the final unabridged History of Wilmington 
Presbytery. 

SlBlack River sources are to be found in Foote's Sketches (check "Index"); Tate's brief work; 

Clippings from the papers; Records of the Church. 
^2As late as 1868 a reason given for organizing a church at Mebane was that the students of the 

Bingham School had to walk five miles in each direction to attend the nearest Presbyterian 

Churches. 

33William Bingham came from Ireland at the age of 29, and sojourned briefly, that is, about 
three or four years, in Wilmington before moving to Pittsboro, where he opened a school. 
Later he taught at the University, but finding the students so ill-prepared, returned to the 
classical school business. For a number of years he and his sons conducted schools located 
at several different places, including the Crossroads Church, Hillsboro, and Mebane, before 
finally moving to Asheville about 1890. He married Ann Jean Slingsby, daughter of Col. 
Slingsby, the respected Tory, who was killed during the Battle of the Tory Hole at Eliza- 
bethtown. Bingham trained many young men destined for distinction. Though an ordained 
Presbyterian minister, he preached very little, and even served at one time as a Ruling Elder. 
He died Feb. 5, 1826, 72 years old. 

340n the authority of J. Kyle Bannerman, Address at Black River Church Homecoming, May, 
1959. See Presbyterian News, Synod of N. C, June, 19 59. Crawford was a native of Scot- 
land who spent the years 1774-1790, preaching to the Gaelic-speaking choirches of the Cape 
Fear. He seems to have been the "unhappy suitor" in a love affair, and his mind became 
impaired. 

35james Hall was one of the most distinguished ministers in North Carolina the latter part 
of the 18th Century and the early part of the 19th. He served churches primarily in and 
around Statesville. He never married. He was distinguished as a teacher. He served in the 
Revolutionary War as a Chaplain. He was a frequent representative to the General Assembly 
and served as Moderator of that Body. He was the first President of the N. C. Bible Asso- 
ciation. In 178 8, he held a meeting in Black River Church. He was often itinerated as a 
Missionary, reaching as far as Natchez, Mississippi. 

36Dr. Samuel E. McCorkle, like Hall, was famous as a preacher and teacher, during the same 
period. He had a hand in the establishment of the University of N. C. His school, Zion- 
Parnassus, was famous, and here many boys, destined for greatness, were educated. He, too, 
held a meeting at Black River 1787. 

•^'^Typescript of only two pages giving meagre information on the Church. Furnished to Synod's 
Office by Mrs. Paul P. Murphy, Lowell, N. C, Oct. 2, 1963. 



51 



<^8There is a copy of one in Synod's Office, sent by Mrs. Murphy, supra. It reads: 

"These do certify that the bearer, Patrick Murphy, his spouse and family natives of 
the parish underwritten, who resided here the most of their lives behaved themselves, 
loyal subjects of the British crown, free from publish censure of church censure, and 
may be admitted into any Christian Society wherever Providence may determine their 
lot, — attested at Kilmore in Arran, Scotland, this the seventh day of August, one 
thousand seven hundred and seventy-four. 

Hamilton Mims 
Dougald Crawford 
John MacKenna." 

39Xypescript, supra, p. 1. Also a news article, "Black River Chapel," by Elizabeth Janet Black, 

n.d., furnished by Mrs. Murphy, supra. 
40ibid., pp. 1-2. 
41ibid., p. 1. 
42jaiiet black, ibid. 

4^ibid. Miss Black accredits the above stories respectively to Mrs. Laura MacDuffie MacDonald 

and Mrs. Lizzie Bannerman. 
44e. a. Alderman became a fast friend of Woodrow Wilson, and it has been suggested, though 

I think without support, because of Wilson's age, that he played in the church-yard of the 

Black River Church. He was born in 18 56, and his father went to Wilmington in 1875, when 

he was 19. Alderman delivered the eulogy at Wilson's funeral. 
45Dr. Patrick L. Murphy was born Oct. 23, 1 848 in Sampson County. He was educated at 

Hillsboro and the University of Maryland where he received an M.D. degree. He married 

Betty Bumgardner. He became the Superintendent of the Morganton State Hospital when it 

opened in 1 888. He died Sept. 11, 1907 at Morganton. 
46Bannerman, op. cit. 

^'''Colin Lindsay. History declares he was born after his mother was buried alive. He was fre- 
quently in trouble with his Presbytery for excessive use of ardent spirits and an explosive 
temper. He opposed revivalism. He preached principally at Bethel, but also at Lumber Bridge 
and other places. Though he was deposed from the ministry his people adored and followed 
him. He died December 1, 1817, and is buried about the middle of Stewartsville Cemetery, 
near Laurinburg. 

48Sam'uel Stanford. Dr. R. F. Campbell, speaking at the Centennial of Synod, 1813, said of him: 
"If the Synod ever erects a Hall of Fame, there should be placed upon its walls a conspicuous 
tablet to the memory of the Rev. R. A. Stanfield, who introduced the resolution that marked 
the change from the old order to the new." (page 58, Centennial Addresses.) 

49Foote, op. cit., pp. \77-\7%. 

^OSee Footnote 21. 

SlSee Footnote 16. 

52He was born in 1768 and died in 1843. He served 50 years in the ministry. He was on two 
occasions Pastor at Fayetteville, and helped organize the first Church there in 1800. His fame 
has lived after him there, and also in the Poplar Tent Church Community in Concord Pres- 
bytery where he conducted a famous school. 

^"^Information on him is meagre. He was a native of Moore County and died at the age of 
3 9, ten years after ordination. See General Catalogue, Union Theological Seminary, 1807-1924, 

54No reliable information available on him. In a news article, in a Wilmington paper, July 

13, 1961, it is said that he served Grove Church ten years, then went to Texas. 
^^See Footnote 5 2. 

56s. D. Hatch. Information on him unavailable. 

^"^Ministerial Directory, 3 53 ; Church bulletin for October 12, 1956. 
58No information on him. 
^^Directory, p. 84. 

eOSee Note 10. . ■ ; 

61"Rockfish Presbyterian Church," a typescript, p. 1. 

^^Directory, p. 3 20. Other leaders who supported the women were Rev. W. M. Miller, Rev. 

Peter Mclntyre, Rev. A. D. McClure, Dr. Charles G. Vardell, Dr. Egbert W. Smith, Dr. 

Walter W. Moore, Dr. Neil Anderson, Dr. Walter L. Lingle, and the Rev. George Atkinson. 
S^Eor full information on her, see Dudley, op. cit., p. 50, Note 12 5. 
54ibid. 
65ibid. 

66Erazer Hood, If Ye Kneiv These Things, p. 12. 
S'i'Campbell, op. cit., p. 60. 

68ibid., p. 61. . - 

69 Andrew J. Howell; See Directory, p. 3 32. 

^OM/;n//fi o/ S3;;70(/ o/ iV. C, 193 6, pp. 340ff. ^ . 



52 



ROSTER OF MINISTERS WHO HAVE APPEARED ON THE ROLLS 
OF WILMINGTON PRESBYTERY 
1868 - 1968'- 



RECEIVED 



1868 
Munroe, Hugh A. 
Kelly, James 
Shaw, Colin 
Alexander, S. C. 
Black, D. B. 
Singleton, H. L. 
Marable, B. F. 
Sprunt, J. M. 
McKinnon, Luther 
Isler, S. H. 

1869 
Graves, N. Z. 

1870 
Burr, H. B. 
McFadyen, Archibald 
Kirkland, Alexander 

1872 
Dickson, A. F. 

1873 
Johnson, T. C. 

1874 
Payne, C. M. 

1875 

Wilson, Joseph R. 
McMillan, George W. 
Miller, R. A. 
1876 

McDonald, Kenneth 

1877 
Garriss, H. B. 

1878 
Chapman, R. H. 

1879 
Black, J. S. 

1880 
McAlpine, R. B. 

1883 

Rose, John M., Jr. 

1884 
Primrose, John W. 
Phillips, A. L. 

1885 
Hoge, Peyton H. 

1886 
Stanford, John D. 
Hines, J. J. 

1887 
Mclntyre, Peter 
McMullen, J. C. 



1889 

Miller, William McC. 

1890 
Smith, Letcher 

1891 
McClure, A. D. 

1892 
Jerkins, Michael 

1893 
Newkirk, J. T. 
Evans, Joseph 
Wood, J. S. 

1895 
Rawlings, J. M. 

1896 
Wallace, B. E. 
Wakefield, John 
Robertson, Ivanhoe 
Morton, Paul C. 

1897 
Lancaster, R. V. 
Winecoff, J. E. L. 

1898 
Shaw, W. M. 
Thomas, J. Stanley 

1899 
Williams, R. M. 
McGeachy, D. P. 
Lane, Edward E. 

1900 
Curtis, L. W. 
Wells, Lucien E. 

1901 
Wells, John M. 
Mann, R. M. 

1902 
Trawick, C. W. 
Starbuck, V. H. 
Story, J. C. 

1903 
Johnston, T. D. 

1904 
Crowley, J. S. 
Currie, W. P. M. 

1905 

McCaskill, Kenneth 

1907 
Clark, P. L. 
Carr, E. B. 



1908 
Plowden, J. M. 
Sikes, W. M. 

1909 
Smith, F. B. 
1912 

Lapsley, R. A., ]r. 
Davidson, W. W. 
Newland, L. T. 
Howell, A. J. 
Koelling, H. W. 
Thomas, James 

1913 
Baker, Wm. McL 
Eubank, W. H. 

1914 
Morton, W. W. 

1915 
Gibbs, J. M. 
Mathis, George 
Maxwell, A. S. 

1916 
Goodman, W. H. 
Hollingsworth, W. F. 
Purcell, J. W. 

1917 
Allen, Thomas P. 
King, Robert 

1918 
Phipps, John R. 
Young, J. W. 
Stork, J. W. 
Elmore, G. H. 

1919 
Caldwell, D. T. 
Mann, J. O. 
Sneed, H. L. 
Beaty, H. F. 

1920 
DuBose, P. W. 
Faw, G. R. 
Murray, J. J. 
Pardo, C. O. 

1921 
Cumming, W, C. 
Fleming, N. N. 
Oldham, George W. 

1922 
McGeachy, D. M. 
Fleming, J. K. 
Gilmour, A. D. P. 



McBryde, J. M. 
McClure, R. E. 
Nicholson, W. A. 
Worth, C. W. 

1923 
Davis, C. W. 
Heller, C. B. 
Currie, W. M. 

1924 
Fairly, J. L. 
Myers, C. C. 
Neill", W. B. 
Plowden, J. M. 
Smith, Wm. C. 

1925 
Clontz, R. C. 
Pharr, J. T. 
Wauchope, W. C. 
Wilson, W. L. 

1926 
West, W. E. 
Gibson, A. V. 
Harness, S. G. 
Tremain, M. A. 
Williamson, D. L. 

1927 
Dulin, D. H. 
Whitmore, J. H. 
Knox, W. B. 
Miller, J. W. 
Murray, M. J. 

1928 

McCutchen, K. B. 
Goodman, F. L. 

1929 
Johnston, F. S. 
Poole, R. H. 
Storey, C. H. 

1930 
Adams, P. C. 
Boyd, J. A. 
Poole, H. R. 

1931 
Knight, J. L 
Stell, L. L 
Sommers, M. O. 

1932 
Phipps, James R. 

1933 
Davis, J. M. 
Hall, B. F., Jr. 



'•"Those who were dismissed and later received again are not repeated. Ordinations are not 
designated. After 193 0 the date of reception is the year the name appears in the Minutes of 
the General Assembly rather than the exact year of reception by a Presbytery. 

'•■'•"Negro Evangelist, Stated Supply of Grace Sunday School, Beaufort, N. C, 1892-95. 



53 



1 93 5 Mosser, Cameron D. L. McGinnis, J. W. 

,r S C Waggctt, J. M. Snively, Stadford T. 



Farric, „. ^. 
Kcsslcr, L. W. 

193 6 
Engle, R. M. 
Jones, D. L. 
Withrow, J. D., Jr. 

1937 
Worth, C. W. 

1938 
Thompson, E. F. 
Wilson, G. A., Jr. 

193 9 
Dickens, J. Ray 
Echols, J.' T. 
MacQucen, M. C. 
Potts, J. R. 
Rose, B. L. 
Seawright, K. C. 

1940 
Morrison, J. G. 

1941 
Kennedy, J. R. 

1942 
Carr, E. B. 
Craig, C. B. 
Crowe, Wm., Jr. 
Ormond, B. F., Jr. 
Wicker, W. M. 

1943 
Dudley, A. K. 

1944 
Bain, F. M. 
Blain, C. R. 
Bowling, J. K. 
Cory, P. M. 
Cowan, L. F. 
Dotson, B. E. 
Gammon, R. R. 
Gleason, C. R. 
Sprunt, D. W. 

1945 
Allison, W. H. 
Farrior, N. P. 
Rhodes, Daniel D. 

1946 
Axtell, J. V. 
Brown, B. F. 
Clarke, E. H. 
Hood, W. B. 
McLeod, J. D. 
Smith, J. Murphy 
Taylor, L. A. 
Thompson, F. M. 
Witherspoon, E. D. 

1947 
Bennett, W. C. 
Garvin, James F. 



1948 
Bowles, D. A. 
Goodman, W. H., Jr. 
Lewis, F. W. 
Marrow, James A., Jr. 

1949 
Murray, John E. 
Newbold^ J. M., Jr. 
Stimpson, Millard G. 
Whitcner, Olin M. 
Foley, W. L. 
Conyers, Priestly 

1950 
Mann, J. W. 
McBath, R. L. 
Stevens, Neill G. 
Little, W. F. F. 

1951 
Hayter, J. T. 
Stegall, C. R. 
Turner, Robert Lee 
Ware, J. W. 
Nisbet, J. A. 
Tucker, Leslie 

1952 
Gwynn, Price H. 
Hogue, S. Wylie 
Houck, Samuel W. 
McChesney, M. J. 
Read, Fitzhugh T. 
Ruff, Thomas B. 

1953 
Bird, Taylor 
Fiutcheson, F. C. 
Kaylor, Hubert J. 
McCann, Jerry C. 
Oliver, Preston C. 
Thomas, Samuel N. 
Flowers, Norman LI. 
Kirby, Charles L. 

1954 
Clark, Fitzhugh 
Doherty, George W. 
Moore, Lardner C. 
Williams, George B. 
Steele, John S. 
Walkup, John S. 

1955 

Hilton, Horace H., Jr. 
McChesney, Charles S. 
MacLeod, Joseph B. 
Perkins, Richard F. 
Plexico, J. Clyde 
Russell, J. S., Jr. 

1956 
Daniel, Alvis M. 
Erwin, Reid H. 
Harriss, Albert G. 



1957 
Smythc, Wm. S. 
Mitchell, Harry D. 
Irvine, John M. 
Stevenson, John L. 
Johnson, Richard K. 
Wilkins, Robert J. 
McLean, C. H. 
Andrews, Richard S. 
Connette, FIdward G. 

1958 

Oterson, Adolf, Jr. 
Cook, John S. 
Rawles, Ira H. 
Jenkins, David B. 
Rock, Robert B. 
Brown, J. W. 
Williams, Charles 
Mackinnon, John R. 
Elliott, Frank A. 

1959 
Terry, Wm. H. 
Reaves, Henry L. 
Atwood, James E. 
Lewis, Herbert T. 
Sowerby, Geo. F. II 
Burns, Wm. P. 
Davis, Eugene B. 
Pauley, Wm. E., Jr. 
Torsch, Edward F. 
Mitchell, Harry P. 
Wells, Henry L. 
Wagner, Joseph C. 
Schotanus, W. M. 
Ledbetter, R. S. 

1960 
Willis, Henry L. 
Graham, Randolph W. 
Womack, Francis M. 
Richardson, L. A. 

1961 
Holshouser, J. R. 
Skinner, J. Don 
Link, Robert S. 
Vaughn, W. C. 
Frisby, J. R. 
Tubbs, James B. 

1962 
Horne, Roger E. 
Jackson, John H. 
Childress, R. W. 
Albright, Fred P., Jr. 
Perkins, Wm. T. 
Gross, Edward B. 
Cooper, Drayton 
Viser, John G. 

1963 
Bain, Neil H. 
Sell, James H., Jr. 
Link, Wm. E. 



Childs, Robert R. 
Patterson, S. Curtis 
McDaniel, F. W., Jr. 
Goodwin, Harry R. 
Pepper, Claude G., Jr. 
Campbell John D. 
Wilkerson, John A. 

1964 

Sydnor, Clement A. 
Sawvcr, Geo. F. 
Phillips, Z. J. Ill 
Basham, R. R., Jr. 
Burns, Robert E. Ill 
Thomas, Edwin G. 
Cousar, James E., Jr. 

1965 

Wilson, Richard G. 
Mullis, Troy D. 
Brown, Otis C. 
LaPrade, Lester N. 
Holshouser, W. L., Jr. 
Jones, Jerome C. 
Parks, Jesse M. 
McCutchen, Wm. A., Jr. 

1966 

Jeanneret, Harry K. 
Morton, Paul C. 
McNeill, Odis M. 
Beale, Joseph D. 
Ligon, J. Wendell 

1967 
Tredway, M. W. 
Dail, John R. 
Love, Murray E. 
Plott, Ted J. 
Dellert, James R. 
Flannagan, Wm. M. 
Moore, Charles R. 

1968 

Alexander, John L. 
Davis, Kenneth K. 
McClung, G. A. 
Rice, James M. 
HesSi Curtis C. 
Fisher, Herman E. 
McCutchen, Chalmers 
Clegg, Charles 
Porter, W. Clark III 
Wines, Robert C. 
Kennerly, Ira A. 
Douglas, M. T. 
Spence, Thomas K., Jr. 
Currie, Thomas W. 
McMillan, Neil M. 
Todd, Wm. H. 
McChesney, Graham C. 
Smith, Cothran G. 
Orders, J. William 



MODERATORS OF 

1. Rev. Colin Shaw— F 1868 

2. Rev. James M. Sprunt — S 1869 

3. Rev. D. B. Black— F 1869 

4. Rev. N. Z. Graves— S 1870 

5. Rev. James Kelly— F 1870 

6. Rev. H. A. Monroe— S 1871 
No moderator listed in F 1871 

7. Rev. A. McFadyen— S 1872 

8. Rev. Colin Shaw— F 1872 

9. Rev. H. B. Burr— S 1873 
No moderator listed in F 1873 

10. Rev. T. C. Johnson— S 1874 

11. Rev. S. H. Isler—F 1874 

12. Rev. B. F. Marable— S 1875 

13. Rev. Joseph R. Wilson, DD— F 1875 

14. Rev. Alex Kirkland — S 1876 

15. Rev. C. M. Payne— F 1876 

16. Rev. R. A. Miller— S 1877 

17. Rev. K. McDonald— F 1877 

18. Rev. B. F. Marable— S 1878 
No Fall meeting. 

19. Rev. R. H. Chapman— S 1879 
No Fall meeting. 



WILMINGTON PRESBYTERY 
1868-1886 

20. Rev. Geo. W. McMillan— S 18 80 
No Fall meeting. 

2 1 . Rev. James Kelly — S 18 81 

22. Rev. Colin Shaw — F 1881 

23. Rev. R. B. McAlpine— S 1882 

24. Rev. S. H. Isler—F 1882 

2 5. Rev. J. T. Black— S 1883 

26. Rev. John M. Rose, Jr.— F 18 83 

27. Rev. C. M. Payne— S 18 84 

28. Rev. Geo. W. McMillan— F 1884 

29. Rev. Joseph R. Wilson, DD— S 188 5 

3 0. Rev. Kenneth McDonald — F 188 5 
31. Rev. Alex L. Phillips— S 18 86 

STATED CLERKS 

1. Rev. Luther McKinnon, F 1868— F 1871 

2. Rev. James M. Sprunt, F 1871— F 18 84 

3. Rev. Archibald McFadyen, S 1 88 5— 

TREASURERS 

1. RE J. C. Smith, F 1868— F 1870 

2. RE Alexander Sprunt, F 1870— S 187 5 

3. RE John McLaurin, S 187 5— 



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RULING ELDERS OF WILMINGTON PRESBYTERY 



LISTED IN ORDER AS THEY APPEAR 
IN MINUTES, 1868-1884 



1. James Garrison— Kekh, F 1868; S 1870 

2. J. W. Wright — Clinton, F 1868; F 1876 

3. J. M. Murphy — Moore's Creek F 1868 

4. Dr. C. T. Murphy— Oak Plain, F 1868; 
S 1869; S 1870; F 1870; F 1871; S 1872 

5. B. F. Grady — Clinton, S 1869; S 1870; 
F 1874 

6. J. K. Morisey— Spring Vale, S 1869 

7. John Everitt — Goldsboro, S 1869; F 1870 

8. J. S. Hand— Pike, S 1869 

9. H. W. Beatie — Black River Chapel, 
F 1869; S 1874 

10. Thomas Graves — Clinton, F 1869 

11. E.N.Robinson — Beth Car, S 1 870 ; 
S 1872; F 1883 

12. N. T. Harris— Mt. Horeb, S 1870 

13. Benjamin Whitfield — Goldsboro, S 1870 

14. J. C. Wooten— Beaver Creek, S 1870 

15. J. C. McMillan— Mt. Zion, S 1870 

16. C. H. Robinson — Wilmington First, 
S 1870; F 1883 

17. E. W. Kerr— Black River Chapel, 
F 1870; Clinton, S 1874 

18. J. H. Hicks — Union, F 1870 

19. P. Murphy — Oak Plain, S 1 871 

20. S. W. Caldwell— Goldsboro, S 1871; 
F 1874; F 1875 

21. J. C. Wootin— Cobb's Mill, S 1871; 
S 1872 

22. James Murphy — Black River Chapel, 
F 1871 

23. D. C. Humphrey — Swansboro, S 1872 

24. J. D. Currie — Brown Marsh, S 1872 

2 5. W. K. Cromartie— Mt. Horeb, S 1872; 

S 1877 

26. James Dickson — Grove and Union, 
F 1872 

27. C. S. Kerr— Black River Chapel, 
S 1873 

28. M. McLeod — Brown Marsh, S 1873; 

S 1844 

29. Charles Duffy — Catharine Lake, F 1873 

30. James A. Kelly — Brown Marsh, F 1873 

31. Sam Northrup — Wilmington First, F 1873 

3 2. Jno. H. Murphy — Moore's Creek, 

S 1874; F 1883 
3 3. W. D. Pearsall — Grove and Union, 
S 1874 

34. C. G. Cox— Catharine Lake, S 1874 
3 5. P. W. Wooley— White Hall, S 1874; 
S 1876 



3 6. A. J. Brown— White Hall, F 1874 
3 7. John H. Maxwell — Whiteville, S 1875 
3 8. W. H. Sellars— Whiteville, F 187 5 

3 9. E. T. Pryford— Pike and Rockfish, 

S 1876 

40. J. W. Colvin — Moore's Creek. S 1876 

41. W. T. Thompson — Grove and Union, 
S 1876 

42. J. T. Plaver — Richlands & Mt. Williams, 
S 1877; F 1883 

43. Samuel Player — Richlands & Mt. Williams, 
F 1868; F 1871; S 1874; S 1875; S 1877; 
S 1879; S 1881; F 1882 

44. John McLaurin — Wilmington First, 
S 1872; S 1875; F 1876; S 1877; 

F 1877; S 1878; F 1878; F 1879; 
F 1881; S 1882 

4 5. R. T. Bowden — Pike & Rockfish, F 1877 

46. G. S. Carr — Mt. Zion, F 1869; F 1870; 

F 1871; F 1872; S 1873; S 1876; F 1877; 
S 1881; S 1882; S 1883 

47. Aaron M. Colvin — Moore's Creek, F 1876; 
F 1877; S 1883 

48. James L. Corbett — Black River Chapel, 
F 1877; S 1879; S 1882; F 1882 

49. D. McMillan— Topsail, F 1871; F 1872; 

F 1873; F 1874; F 1875; F 1877; S 1878; 
S 1879; S 1880; S 1882; S 1883 

50. H. Broadhurst — Mt. Olive, S 1 875; 
F 1877; S 1878; F 1878 

51. Harvey Cox — Richlands, S 1873; 
F 1875; F 1877; S 1878; S 1882 

52. J. H. Moore — Hopewell, S 1878; S 1883 

5 3. J. H. Alderman — Pike & Rockfish, 

S 1878 

54. Jimes W. Boney — Mt. Zion, S 1875 ; 
S 1878 

5 5. J. F. Dunn— Whiteville & White Plains, 
S 1878; F 1878; S 1880; S 1881 

5 6. R. W. Moore — Keith, F 1871; S 1 873 ; 
S 1874; S 1878; S 1880 

5 7. Joseph H. Carr — Grove & Union, S 1878; 
F 1881 

58. H. W. Beatty— Black River Chapel, 

S 1875; F 1876; S 1877; S 1878; S 1880 

59. Alex Sprunt — Wilmington Second, 
F 1871; S 1872; S 1873; S 1874; 

S 1875; S 1876; S 1878; F 1878; 
S 1880; F 1880; S 1882; S 1883 

60. B. Bender — Seminary, S 1878 

61. T. B. Hyman— Goldsboro, S 1877; 
S 1878; S 1879; S 1880; F 1880; 
S 1881; S 1882; S 1883 



59 



62. L. W. Robinson — Oak Plain, S 1874; 
S 1875; S 1876; S 1878; F 1878 

63. A. J. Brown— White Hall, S 1878 

64. W. H. G. Beatty — South River Chapel, 
S 1870; S 1878; S 1880 

65. W. A. Faison — Spring Vale, F 1870; 
S 1876; F 1878; F 1881; S 1882 

66. W. J. Boney — Pike & Rockfish, 
F 1871; S 1872; F 1878; S 1879; 
S 1880; F 1881; S 1883 

67. R. W. Collins— Keith, F 1878; S 1879; 
S 1881; F 1881; S 1882; S 1883 

68. A. R. Hicks — Grove & Union, 
F 1878; S 1879; F 1881 

69. J. W. Gerlick— Goldsboro, 
S 1876; F 1878; F 1879 

70. W. J. Cromartie — South River Chapel, 
F 1868; S 1869; F 1870; F 1871; 

S 1872; S 1873; F 1874; S 1875; 
F 1876; F 1878; S 1879; S 1881; 
F 1881; F 1882; S 1883; F 1883 

71. W. T. Bannerman — Hopewell, F 1869; 
F 1871; F 1873; S 1875; S 1879; 
Burgaw, S 1880; S 1881; F 1881 

72. A. Southerland — Mt. Zion, F 1871 
S 1874; S 1879; F 1883 

73. J. C. Smith — Wilmington First, 
F 1868; F 1871; S 1874; S 1879 

74. John Colville — Wilmington Second, 
S 1877; S 1879; F 1879; S 1880; 

S 1881; F 1882 

7 5. A. H. Perry — Whiteville & White Plains 

— S 1879 

76. J. H. Ballentine — Brown Marsh, 
F 1876; F 1879; F 1881; F 1882 

77. J. A. Faison — Union, S 1880; 
S 1881; F 1883 

78. John M. Johnston — Mt. Horeb, 
F 1873; F 1875; S 1880; F 1882 

79. W. N. Whitted— Beth Car, S 1880 

80. D. T. Burney — Brown Marsh, 
S 1775; S 1880; F 1883 

81. James W. Cromartie — Elizabethtown, 
F 1773; S 1880 

82. B. F. Hall— Wilmington First, 
S 1880; F 1880 

8 3. J. W. Fountain — Richlands, 

S 1880; S 1881; F 1882; S 1883 
84. James N. Henry — Moore's Creek, 

S 1880; F 1882 
8 5. J. J. Frazier — Whiteville, S 1880 

86. D. J. Clarke— White Plains, S 1880 

87. M. H. Wooten— White Hall, 
S 1880; S 1881 

88. George S. Kirby — Goldsboro, 
S 1880; F 1881 

89. J. W. Boney— Rockfish, F 1869; S 1870; 
F 1871; F 1874; F 1875; F 1876; S 1877; 
S 1881; F 1882 



90. James B. Carr — Grove, F 1869; F 1871; 
S 1881; F 1883 

91. R. J. Southerland — Mt. Olive, 
S 1776; S 1881 

92. H. J. McMillan— Topsail, S 1881; F 1881 

93. Neill Graham — Mt. Horeb, F 1868; 
S 1876; S 1881; F 1881; S 1883 

94. W. N. Campbell— Brown Marsh, S 1881 

95. S. T. Buie— White Plains, 
S 1872; F 1876; S 1881 

96. H. E. Shaw — Black River Chapel, S 1881 

97. B. F. Sanders — Hopewell, 
F 1868; F 1881; S 1882 

98. W. L Thompson — Union, F 1881 

99. Warren Johnson — Clinton, F 1881 

100. John W. Stokes— Oak Plain, 
F 1881; S 1882 

101. Robert McDougal — Wilmington Second, 
F 1881; F 1881; F 1883 

102. W. B. Whitfield— White Hall, F 1881 

103. C. Johnson — Black River Chapel, F 1881 

104. A. F. Burney— White Plains, F 1881 
10 5. John Hand — Pike, S 1875; S 1882 

106. G. B. Carr — Rockfish, 
F 1872; S 1882; F 1883 

107. James W. Colin — Moore's Creek, S 1882 

108. W. M. Hand— Burgaw, S 1882 

109. R. T. Williams— Mt. Williams, 
F 1873; F 1875; S 1882 

110. H. A. McEachern — Whiteville, S 1882 

111. D. G. Robeson — Mt. Horeb, S 1882 

112. I. R. Faison — Union, S 1882; 
F 1882; S 1883 

113. T. J. Morisey— Clinton, S 1882 

114. A. R. Hicks, Jr. — Mt. Olive, 
S 1882; S 1883 

115. J. A. Bordeaux — Pike, F 1882; S 1883 

116. E. C. Smith — Oak Plain, F 1882 

117. T. W. Boney — Mt. Zion, F 1882 

118. E. W. Kerr— Clinton, F 1882 

119. B. G. Worth — Wilmington First, F 1882 

120. D. J. Bordeaux — Keith, F 1871; F 1882 

121. W. H. Williams— Grove, S 1883 

122. J. M. Benton — Elizabethtown, 
S 1883; F 1883 

123. George Chadbourn — Wilmington First, 
S 1883 

124. J. R. Bannerman — Mt. Williams, S 1883 

125. J. W. Cowan — Burgaw, S 1883 ; F 1883 
12 6. Henry Farrior — Mt. Olive, F 1883 

127. J. M. Corbett — Black River Chapel, 
F 1883 

128. H. W. Burwell— Goldsboro, F 1883 

129. M. J. Boney— Duplin Road, S 1885 



60 



'ILUINGTON PRII